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I have been living here for 20 years.

I have lived here for 20 years.

A grammar book says these sentences are interchangeable.

I agree. In most cases they are.

I would like to check that they are not interchangeable in the following case:

Case: I am now leaving the town because I have decided to move into a new place.

Then I say, "I have lived here for 20 years."

In this case, "I have been living here for 20 years" is not suitable.

However, I am not a native speaker of English, and I would like to hear native speakers' opinion.

Comments  
SnappyIn this case, "I have been living here for 20 years" is not suitable.

It is fine. In fact, it seems to express the speaker's weariness with the place better if that's what you want. The two sentences are as close to interchangeable as they can be.

anonymous
SnappyIn this case, "I have been living here for 20 years" is not suitable.

It is fine. In fact, it seems to express the speaker's weariness with the place better if that's what you want. The two sentences are as close to interchangeable as they can be.

Then if a foreigner is leaving in Japan, the foreigner can say either, "I have lived in Japan for three years" or "I have been living in Japan for three years."? I thought that "I have lived in Japan" was more suitable to express the end of the period.

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SnappyThen if a foreigner is leaving in Japan, the foreigner can say either, "I have lived in Japan for three years" or "I have been living in Japan for three years."? I thought that "I have lived in Japan" was more suitable to express the end of the period.

I see what you mean, but I suppose the choice would depend on the exact context. It is perfectly possible to use the progressive in the right situation.

"I am so over sushi and bowing and idol girls who look like 10-year-olds. I have been living in Japan for three years now, and enough is enough."