I heard an Englishman on television use this construction. It sounds wrong to my north american ear. But is this considered 'correct' UK usage?
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I heard an Englishman on television use this construction. It sounds wrong to my north american ear. But is this considered 'correct' UK usage?

I don't think so. There might be dialects where it is normal, but I'm not sure that there are. When you hear such a usage, it is most usually the case that the speaker has lost his way.

But if you are so keen on correct usage, do you not think that you should also adopt the general conventions on capitalisation?

PB
I heard an Englishman on television use this construction. It sounds wrong to my north american ear. But is this considered 'correct' UK usage?

I don't think so. There might be dialects where it is normal, but I'm not sure that there are. When ... are so keen on correct usage, do you not think that you should also adopt the general conventions on capitalisation?

Maybe he's adopted the Guardian's conventions instead..

Cheers, Harvey
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I heard an Englishman on television use this construction. It sounds wrong to my north american ear. But is this considered 'correct' UK usage?

I don't think so. There might be dialects where it is normal, but I'm not sure that there are. When you hear such a usage, it is most usually the case that the speaker has lost his way.

Ignore Padraig. This form of the past perfect is standard dialect in much of Scotland and in the far north of England.
Adrian
I don't think so. There might be dialects where it ... usually the case that the speaker has lost his way.

Ignore Padraig. This form of the past perfect is standard dialect in much of Scotland and in the far north of England. Adrian

Not in the North of England where I was born and raised. Nor have I ever heard a Scot use it.

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Ignore Padraig. This form of the past perfect is standard dialect in much of Scotland and in the far north of England. Adrian

Not in the North of England where I was born and raised.

Oh, that North of England. We didn't/don't use the construction in Cheshire but they do north of the A66.
Nor have I ever heard a Scot use it.

Nonsense. Do a search (on Google or your memory) on "he's came", "he's went", etc. and you'll find plenty of examples.
Adrian
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But but but ... that wasn't the question. See subject line - it says 'have came'.
And if I say I have never heard a Scot use it, in what way is that 'nonsense'? I have never heard a Scot use it. If you have, our experiences are different. Neither set of experiences in this regard is nonsense. I've no doubt of finding examples of pretty much anything on Google. The question was whether 'have came' is considered correct UK usage. I would say no. If you want to extend the question into 'is 'have came' standard dialect anywhere in the UK' I would still say no. I wouldn't dispute that people use it, but I don't think it's localised. A Google on 'have came' shows it in use all over the world. Like
http://members.tripod.com/jessie-j/Misc%20Parts.htm . That's what one guy in Kentucky says. Do you think they all do? But I see no evidence of concentration Oop North.

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Not in the North of England where I was born and raised.

Oh, that North of England. We didn't/don't use the construction in Cheshire but they do north of the A66.

Er... Where does "North of England" start?
North of River Thames?
North of Hull?
North of Liverpool and Sheffield?
Are these "North of England" maps?
http://www.thenoe.com/Map.htm
http://cycle-n-sleep.co.uk/train%20map/north%20england.htm http://www.welcomingyou.co.uk/N England/

Enrico C
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Oh, that North of England. We didn't/don't use the construction in Cheshire but they do north of the A66.

Er... Where does "North of England" start? North of River Thames? North of Hull? North of Liverpool and Sheffield?

North of the Watford Gap.
Are these "North of England" maps? http://www.thenoe.com/Map.htm http://cycle-n-sleep.co.uk/train%20map/north%20england.htm

Includes southern Scotland.
http://www.welcomingyou.co.uk/N England/

But otherwise, you have maps showing the north of England, depending on your definition of the area.
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