As far as I know, you usually can't leave out "got" after "have" in negative and interrogative sentences. Grammars say that you may sound very formal if you leave out "got" in this sort of sentences but, for some reason, they supply the same one example: "Have you an appointment?" ("Practical English Usage", "Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary"). Why ever do they never say "Have you a penny?" or "I haven't a job", which I understand are seen as very unlikely?

I'm saying so because an English native speaker has recently pointed out my leaving out "got" after "I haven't" on a message I'd sent to an Italian ng about English, it.cultura.linguistica.inglese:
QUOTE
I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex. Do you?UNQUOTE (http://snipurl.com/8aoq)

She said it sounded very bad; not formal, but very bad.

Michael Swan has this example on page 230 (article 241.1) of his "Practical English Usage":
QUOTE
"Have you any brothers or sisters?"
UNQUOTE
and this on page 231 (article 241.6)
QUOTE
"Birmingham has not the charm of York or Edinburgh" (formal GB only) UNQUOTE
besides the aforementioned "Have you an appointment?".

I wonder why these three examples Swan supplies:
1) Have you any brothers or sisters?
2) Birmingham has not the charm of York or Edinburgh?
3) Have you an appointment?
don't sound bad to a British ear for I assume they don't , while mine

"I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex"

did.
By the way, I've often read on grammars and dictionaries that "got" after "have" is colloquial. Can it always be left out in formal speech, then? Why do such things as "Have you a car?", or "I haven't a job", or "I haven't it" don't sound very natural to me?
Thanks in advance.
Bye, FB

Io ho deciso di rifiutarmi di vederlo: Ettore con la faccia di Eric Banana mi fa venire i conati.
(commento sul film "Troy" su it.fan.scrittori.tolkien)
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Why do such things as "Have you a car?", or "I haven't a job", or "I haven't it" don't sound very natural to me?

Er, it must be recasted:
"Why do such things as not sound very natural to me?".
Bye, FB

Mrs. Palmer, in her way, was equally angry. 'She was determined to drop his acquaintance immediately, and she was very thankful that she had never been acquainted with him at all'. (Jane Austen)
1) Have you any brothers or sisters?

Do you have any brothers or sisters?
2) Birmingham has not the charm of York or Edinburgh.

Birmingham doesn't have the charm of York or Endinburgh.
3) Have you an appointment?

Do you have an appointment?

John Briggs
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I guess you're American, though.
Bye, FB

Mrs. Palmer, in her way, was equally angry. 'She was determined to drop his acquaintance immediately, and she was very thankful that she had never been acquainted with him at all'. (Jane Austen)
1) Have you any brothers or sisters?

Do you have any brothers or sisters?
2) Birmingham has not the charm of York or Edinburgh.

Birmingham doesn't have the charm of York or Endinburgh.
3) Have you an appointment?

Do you have an appointment?

John Briggs
I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex. Do you?

She said it sounded very bad; not formal, but very bad.

"I don't have a dead-key character for the circumflex. Do you?"

You might have got away with:
"I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex. Have you?"
John Briggs
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I'm saying so because an English native speaker has recently pointed out my leaving out "got" after "I haven't" on a message I'd sent to an Italian ng about English, it.cultura.linguistica.inglese:

Some of your examples sound OK and some sound very British to my American ear. None are particularly objectionable, though they would be better if rephrased as suggested by John Briggs.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
As far as I know, you usually can't leave out "got" after "have" in negative and interrogative sentences. Grammars say ... they never say "Have you a penny?" or "I haven't a job", which I understand are seen as very unlikely?

I really don't understand this question.
I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex. Do you?

UNQUOTE (http://snipurl.com/8aoq) She said it sounded very bad; not formal, but very bad.

Was she commenting on the omission of "got" or the use of "do you"?

Please note that my comments are from a British-English perspective. Firstly you have to understand that what is termed the "formal" register is almost unknown to many people. When they hear an example of it, it jars terribly. Secondly, the have-do combination is very unusual in British English and sounds dead wrong. Your question should be "Have you?" or "Have you got one?"
Michael Swan has this example on page 230 (article 241.1) of his "Practical English Usage": QUOTE "Have you any brothers ... Edinburgh. 3) Have you an appointment? don't sound bad to a British ear for I assume they don't ,

Why do you assume this? When someone says something sounds "bad" or "wrong", they don't necessarily mean it's wrong. They might mean it sounds posh, antiquated, peculiar, out of register, or whatever. Your example (2) does indeed sound bad - it's very formal indeed. Change "has not" to "hasn't", though, and all three examples pass muster in formal speech.
while mine "I haven't a dead-key character for the circumflex" did.

Context is important. All three examples above could be used in a formal context, in which they would be fine. Your sentence wasn't written in a formal context, so it wasn't fine.
By the way, I've often read on grammars and dictionaries that "got" after "have" is colloquial. Can it always be ... as "Have you a car?", or "I haven't a job", or "I haven't it" don't sound very natural to me?

Because you're not used to them and they're not used very much. Formal contexts are the exception rather than the rule.
Adrian (UK)
Why do such things as "Have you a car?", or "I haven't a job", or "Ihaven't it" don't sound very natural to me?

Er, it must be recasted:

recast
Adrian
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