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Hi

Can you help on this?

1) I have discussed this and I was told not to do it.

OR

2) I had discussed this and I was told not to do it.

I think both are correct. Just that for (1) it did not state when the discussion took place whereas in (2) The discussion was over and past.

Correct?

Thank you.
Comments  
Hi,


1) I have discussed this and I was told not to do it.

OR

2) I had discussed this and I was told not to do it.

I think both are correct. Just that for (1) it did not state when the discussion took place whereas in (2) The discussion was over and past.

Broadly speaking, that's right. In #1, the focus is on now. In #2, the focus is on some time in the past.

Best wishes, Clive
To be strict, IMO, these should be:

1) I have discussed this and I (have) been told not to do it.

OR

2) I had discussed this and I (had) been told not to do it.

The meanings are as indicated by Clive in the above.
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Thanks to both.

How about this scenario:
1) I spoke to Alan yesterday and he agreed to let me go home earlier next Monday. Then, if I will to relate this to someone else what should I use?

a) I had spoken to Alan and he had agreed to let me go home earlier next week.

OR

b) I have spoken to Alan and he has agreed to let me go home earlier next week.

Which is more right??

Thanks again.
OR this:

c) I had spoken to Alan and he has agreed to let me go home earlier next week.
HarbingerThanks to both.

How about this scenario:
1) I spoke to Alan yesterday and he agreed to let me go home earlier next Monday. Then, if I will to relate this to someone else what should I use?

a) I had spoken to Alan and he had agreed to let me go home earlier next week.

OR

b) I have spoken to Alan and he has agreed to let me go home earlier next week.

Which is more right??

Thanks again.
>1) I spoke to Alan yesterday and he agreed to let me go home earlier next Monday.>Then, if I will to relate this to someone else what should I use?

This shouldn't be changed. You just need to tell that someone (third party) the above.
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Then when should we use Present/past perfect tense??

Thanks
Present perfect for something related to the present:
I have discussed this recently and I (have) been told not to do it.

Past perfect for something which happened before a reference time in the past:
2) I had discussed this with him over the phone before meeting in person (before we met in person) and I (had) been told (by him) not to do it.
thank you.
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