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Can't get this one to play right in my head, using any grammar. I'm a 2nd year language student writing a paper and it needs to be perfect:-)

Astronauts (who) have (having) the best physical en mental conditions, are most likely to be sent to the ISS (Smolders, 1980).

This is a quote from a book but why did they use have and not having? Is there any difference with having? I feel having is better because the astronauts would have to have the qualities every time they go to space. They shouldn't 'lose' them intermittently.
As native speakers, what would you suggest?

many thanks,
Jeroen

Jeroen
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These are both correct and have the same meaning:

Astronauts who have the best physical and mental conditions are most likely to be sent to the ISS (Smolders, 1980).
Astronauts having the best physical and mental conditions are most likely to be sent to the ISS (Smolders, 1980).
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Thank you Mister Micawber. I didn't know that!