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A. I have heard that her album will be launched tomorrow.
B. I heard that her album will be launched tomorrow.
C. I heard that her album would be launched tomorrow. (Backshifting)

1. What is the difference in meaning between 'have heard' and 'heard' in the sentences above?
2. I believe B and C have the same meaning, although in C, the other verb backshifted with the main verb 'heard'. Can 'would', which is actually future in the past, go with the word 'tomorrow' in a sentence to begin with?
3. If 'would' is not possible to go with 'tomorrow', how should I rephrase sentence C?
4. However, I believe 'would' can go with the word 'tomorrow' in an unreal conditional, eg. He would play tennis with you tomorrow if he were available. Is this correct?
5. Which do you think among my example sentences above sounds best in the given context?

Please advise. I would be very grateful.
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A. I have heard that her album will be launched tomorrow.
B. I heard that her album will be launched tomorrow.
C. I heard that her album would be launched tomorrow. (Backshifting)

1. What is the difference in meaning between 'have heard' and 'heard' in the sentences above? There is no noticeable difference.

2. I believe B and C have the same meaning (Yes. All three are the same, in fact.), although in C, the other verb backshifted with the main verb 'heard'. Can 'would', which is actually future in the past, go with the word 'tomorrow' in a sentence to begin with? Yes. would and tomorrow can both be used in the same sentence like that.

3. If 'would' is not possible to go with 'tomorrow', how should I rephrase sentence C? Rephrasing is not necessary, but would = was going to.
4. However, I believe 'would' can go with the word 'tomorrow' in an unreal conditional, eg. He would play tennis with you tomorrow if he were available. Is this correct? Yes.

5. Which do you think among my example sentences above sounds best in the given context? They are so nearly equal that it is impossible to choose one. I'd probably say B. All three are fine.

CJ
Without going into the nitty gritty, I'd try to explain this using a few examples -

'I have heard that her album will be launched tomorrow' conveys that the speaker heard about the launch at an indefinite time in the past.However, I heard that her album will be launched suggests that the speaker heard this at a definite time in the past i.e. specific time.

'Would' can go with tomorrow provided you want to convery a little uncertainity. If you're absolutely certain about your visit, you should use will instead of would.

'he were available' should be used only when the condition is unachievable or impossible to change.

If he were tall, he would be able to take part in the basketball competetion.

If he were available, he would definitely take part in the competetion.

I hope my reply helps.
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Thank you, CJ and karansardana, for your comprehensive explanations.
CalifJim3. If 'would' is not possible to go with 'tomorrow', how should I rephrase sentence C? Rephrasing is not necessary, but would = was going to.
Why do we reword 'would' to 'was going to' here when the unbackshifted form is 'will'? What is the difference between 'would' and 'was going to' in the example?

Also, would you agree with karasardana that little difference between 'have heard' and 'heard' is that the former happened in an indefinite past time, whereas the latter heppened in a specific past time?
Hi CJ,

I was wondering if you could help me with my last post, please. Thank you. Emotion: smile
AnonymousWhy do we reword 'would' to 'was going to' here when the unbackshifted form is 'will'?
I don't understand the question.

is going to is a paraphrase of will; was going to is a paraphrase of would.

All of these variants are possible.

I (have) heard that her album [will be / is going to be] launched tomorrow.

I (have) heard that her album [would be / was going to be] launched tomorrow.

will sounds more official; going to sounds more casual. going to suggests a plan.
Anonymoushappened in an indefinite past time, whereas ... in a specific past time
The present perfect is indefinite with regard to time, and the simple past is definite. Yes, I agree with that.

But note that the choice does not depend so much on what actually happened, because everything happens at a definite point in time. It depends on how the speaker is thinking of the event when he talks about it. It depends on how important the time of the event is to the speaker in the context of the message he intends to convey.

CJ
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Is:

I've heard her album would be launched tomorrow, correct too?
CalifJim
AnonymousWhy do we reword 'would' to 'was going to' here when the unbackshifted form is 'will'?
I don't understand the question.

is going to is a paraphrase of will; was going to is a paraphrase of would.
I thought you meant I should change 'would' to 'was going to' in my original sentence. I see both are possible with the difference you explained.
CalifJimBut note that the choice does not depend so much on what actually happened, because everything happens at a definite point in time. It depends on how the speaker is thinking of the event when he talks about it. It depends on how important the time of the event is to the speaker in the context of the message he intends to convey.
I find this really helpful. Thank you very much for this explanation. Emotion: smile
AnonymousI see both are possible
Yes, yes. Both are possible.
AnonymousThank you very much
You're very welcome. Emotion: wink

CJ
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