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Hi

1. I've just passed this exam in December.

--- Shouldn't I rather use the past simple tense: I just passed ... instead of I have just passed ...

2. I had to pass it back in ...

--- Shouldn't it rather be: I had to take it back/I had to sit it back in ... (we're talking about an exam). Is the word "pass" in the original sentence OK?
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I just passed - I only just got enough marks to pass.

I have just passed - I recently passed the exam.

I had to pass it back in - this doesn't work with exams.

Are you confusing pass from your language? - In French they say that the passed their exams, which means they took them. In English pass means you were successful.
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Hi

But in the first sentence we specifically say when this happened "in December". That's why I thought that using the present perfect tense doesn't work here and it should rather be "I just passed my exam in December" instead of "I've just ...".

I supposed that "I had to pass it back in ..." wouldn't work because it should rather be "I had to take it back ..." or "I had to sit it back in ..." Is that right?

I think it's the same as asking: Are you about to pass .... instead of Are you about to take/sit this exam ...
NewguestI think it's the same as asking: Are you about to pass .. instead of Are you about to take/sit this exam ...
No it isn't the same. Are you about to pass your exams is strange as the person doesn't know if they will pass, they know that they will sit them.
Dave PhillipsNo it isn't the same.
What's not the same? Emotion: wink
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