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Hi,

Please explain the meaning of each sentence (1thru 5).

What's the difference among the following sentences?

1. I'll have my sister pick up the photos for me.

2. I'll make my sister pick up the photos for me.

3. I'll tell my sister to pick up the photos for me.

4. I'll ask my sister to pick up the photos for me.

5. I'll order my sister to pick up the photos for me.

Thanks,
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi GG,

So, "I'll let my sister call you when she comes home" and "I'll have my sister call you when she comes home" mean the same thing? (My sister is not home.)

I wonder if "let sb. do sth." is always equivalent to "have sb. do sth." or it all depends on the context?

___

I looked up a dictionary. 'Tell' has a meaning, which is close to "SAY" --- express in words. It also has another meaning, which is close to "ORDER". Sometimes, it's hard to tell (= distinguish, one more different meaning) which one is which one.

Your discussions reminds me of an old song, "Tell Laura you love her. Tell Laura you need her.... " Is 'tell' closer to "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

"I told her to go home." "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

"I was told not to trust what I read in the newspaper." "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

"Don't tell your mother you've seen that movie." "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

"Do as you are told." "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

"He told us to get out of the car." "ORDER" or "SAY"? Why?

Thanks,
I suggest leaving "let" out of the mix. It means "allow" or "grant permission" and you can find other words to say what you mean besides "let" if you find its use at all confusing, and it's certainly understandable how you could. In the telephone example, it's safer to say "I'll tell (say to) my sister that you called. But you could also say "I'll let her know" - which I guess means "I'll allow her the knowledge" but also means "I'll tell her."

The difference in the two types of tell: If you can insert a THAT, you mean the kind of tell that's the same as say.

Tell Laura (that) you love her.

Don't tell your mother (that) you saw the movie.

Look at the logic behind the sentences you give as examples and see if you can figure out which type of tell they are.
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Hi, GG.

You wrote, "The difference in the two types of tell: If you can insert a THAT, you mean the kind of tell that's the same as say."

I'm not so sure whether the statement above is always true.

For instance,

My sister said she'd pick them up for me, but I didn't realize you close early on Tuesdays. I'll tell her that she must be there before 3:30.

Tell + someone + that clause...., therefore "tell" means "SAY". ( GG's Logic: tell + sb. + that + S. + V. + .... ==> tell = SAY)

Earlier, you wrote:

"Using TELL in the context of telling someone to do something says you that you have the authority over that person to control what they will or will not do. As opposed to: My sister said she'd pick them up for me, but I didn't realize you close early on Tuesdays. I'll tell her to be there before 3:30 In this case, you're not ORDERING her, but letting her know that to complete this task she has already volunteered to do, she needs to be there by 3:30."

I'll tell her to be there before 3:30. The meaning of "tell" is closer to "SAY". But, you can't insert a THAT. How come "tell" still has a meaning, which is closer to "SAY"?

______

I looked up another dictionary: "Tell" can also mean "ADVISE", which is closer to "ORDER".

Tell Laura (that) you love her. Doesn't 'tell' here mean "ADVISE" rather than "SAY"? There's a THAT CLAUSE follows, which makes your logic very confusing.

I'd be happy to see more of your comments and they will certainly help.

Thanks for your replies.
Hi,

Is anyone willing to give it a try?

Thanks,
When it's not to express an order, "tell" is used with the meaning of "advise" or "inform", as in: "Tell Laura that you love her"
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Hi, pieanne or someone else.

I'd be glad if you can let me know how the word "tell" should be interpreted and please give me a good reason.

"Tell Laura you love her. Tell Laura you need her.... " Is 'tell' closer to "ORDER", "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

"I told her to go home." "ORDER", "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

"I was told not to trust what I read in the newspaper." "ORDER", "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

"Don't tell your mother you've seen that movie." "ORDER" or "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

"Do as you are told." "ORDER" or "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

"He told us to get out of the car." "ORDER" or "SAY", "ADVISE" or something else? Why?

Thanks,
MeantolearnHi, pieanne or someone else.

I'd be glad if you can let me know how the word "tell" should be interpreted and please give me a good reason.

"Tell Laura you love her. Tell Laura you need her.... " "SAY"

"I told her to go home." "ORDER" or "ADVISE" depending on context.

"I was told not to trust what I read in the newspaper." "ADVISE"

"Don't tell your mother you've seen that movie." "ADVISE"

"Do as you are told." "ORDER"

"He told us to get out of the car." "ORDER"

In each case, because that's what make sense. Say to Laura that you love her - you can't logically order that, nor can you logically NOT order you mother about something you have done. If you have doubt about what the word means, then use the substitute. When you're writing, you'll know whether you mean "order" as in "Go home!" or "advise" as "Why don't you go on home - I'll call you if there's any change." So you can write "I ordered her to go home" or "With nothing left to do but wait, I advised her to go home and get some rest." Then you don't have to worry about it.