+1

Should I use "have" or "get" in the following sentence?

This enables you to get/have remote access to your email.

If both are possible, do they mean the same thing?

If so, which would you use?

Thank you

+1
teal lime

Should I use "have" or "get" in the following sentence?

This enables you to get/have remote access to your email.

If both are possible, do they mean the same thing?

If so, which would you use?

Thank you

'get' can mean 'obtain' or 'acquire'. In that sense, when you start you don't have a feature called 'remote access to your email', but then you get remote access. Then you have remote access. To get this feature, you may have to buy something, sign up for some service, or perform some procedure.

'have' is sometimes used with the same meaning. It just focuses on the final state of the system, when you have already done everything necessary to get what you wanted to have.

Which would I use? Hmm. Tough choice. Both sound all right to me. Probably 'have'. No. Maybe 'get'. Or maybe 'have'. I guess they sound more or less the same to my ear.

CJ

Comments  

"This enables you to get remote access to your email." is correct

Have is used for something you already own.

Get is used for something you are about to own.

Thanks,

Office English,

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.