+0
"He is the best footballer I have seen play."

"Whom did you see play ?"
Are these sentences correct ?
They don't seem correct, but "I have seen him play" and "I saw him play" are correct.
So why can't these be correct ?
1 2
Comments  
They both seem ok to me.
The "whom" is technically correct, but rarely used in that position. These days, "whom" shows up only immediately after prepositions in most cases, so it's rarely used as a direct object.

Again, it's correct, but will be seen by many as "overly" correct.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
But isn't there a rule that says that there can be no passive form of bare infinitives.
Debpriya DeBut isn't there a rule that says that there can be no passive form of bare infinitives.
That would be news to me.

Could you explain that more?
"They have made him return the money."
The passive of this would be "He has been made to return the money."
The passive form does not use a bare infinitive.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Debpriya DeThe passive form does not use a bare infinitive.
Not with the verb to make, but that doesn't make it universally true.

This is the man she she should have chosen.
The cake I watched her make was delicious.
The song you heard me play was by Barber.
And your original example.

All show this rule is not a universal rule.
Debpriya De"They have made him return the money."The passive of this would be "He has been made to return the money."The passive form does not use a bare infinitive.
I think you're talking about pulling the person or the thing out of the active version to make the subject of a passive sentence. In either case, you can get some really bad sentences. Even the recommended insertion of to doesn't always work. And several others I've added below are iffy. The last of each set is in the form you mentioned first in the original post. Here the relative clause has the relevant structure, but it's not passive.

I watched her make the cake.
*She was watched make the cake (by me).
?Who was watched make the cake?
*The cake was watched make by her (by me).
?She was watched to make the cake.
?The cake was watched to be made.
?The cake was watched made.
?She is the best I've watched make a cake.

You heard me play the song.
*I was heard play the song (by you).
?Who was heard play the song?
*The song was heard play by me (by you).
?I was heard to play the song.
?The song was heard to be played.
?The song was heard played.
?You are the best I've heard play (the song).

I saw the footballer play the game.
*The footballer was seen play the game (by me).
?Who was seen play the game?
*The game was seen play by the footballer (by me).
?The footballer was seen to play the game.
?The game was seen to be played.
?The game was seen played.
?The footballer is the best I've seen play (the game).

CJ
Debpriya De"He is the best footballer I have seen play."
"Whom did you see play ?"
Here are diagrams to show where the gaps are.

He is the best footballer I have seen ____ play. (I have seen him play.)
Whom did you see ____ play? (You did see whom play?)

Neither structure is passive, so I don't know how the thread got off onto a discussion of the passive forms of these structures.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more