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In my understanding, we can say, "I had my car stolen." (had+noun+verb (past participle))

We can also say, "I had him go there." (had+noun+verb (root form))

I saw the following sentence on the Internet:

"I actually had an incident happen that traumatized me."

Is the above sentence OK? The sentence structure seems to be had+noun (an incident)+verb(happen in root form).

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Snappy

"I actually had an incident happen that traumatized me."

Is the above sentence OK?

Yes.

I had him go there. (Causative.)
I had my car stolen. (Not causative. Experiential.)
I actually had an incident happen that traumatized me. (Not causative. Experiential.)


The last is a rephrasing of

I actually had [an incident that traumatized me] happen.

But a part of the long phrase in brackets was transferred to the end so the verb 'happen' could be placed closer to its subject.

CJ

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Snappy"I had my car stolen."

You can, but the reader (American English) might suspect this situation.

You lost your job. The car broke down. You needed money. So you arranged for someone to steal your car. Then you got money for the car from your insurance company.


British speakers use "had" in the non-causative sense much more than Americans do.

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Comments  
CalifJim
Snappy

"I actually had an incident happen that traumatized me."

Is the above sentence OK?

Yes.

I had him go there. (Causative.)
I had my car stolen. (Not causative. Experiential.)
I actually had an incident happen that traumatized me. (Not causative. Experiential.)


The last is a rephrasing of

I actually had [an incident that traumatized me] happen.

But a part of the long phrase in brackets was transferred to the end so the verb 'happen' could be placed closer to its subject.

CJ

I understand. Let me check one thing.

1. I had my car broken. This means somebody broke my car.

2. I had my car break. This means I broke my car (while I was trying to modify, repair, upgrade, etc. my car)

Is my understanding correct?

Snappy1. I had my car broken. This means somebody broke my car.

This doesn't make much sense to me, but you could have "I had my car broken into" ~ Somebody broke into my car (presumably to steal something).

Snappy2. I had my car break. This means I broke my car (while I was trying to modify, repair, upgrade, etc. my car)

More likely "I had my car break down" ~ "Something happened that caused my car to stop working".

Both sentences are non-causative.

CJ

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.