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In this sentence below do I use "have" honored or "has" honored?

Since 1985, the Northeast Spa and Pool Association have honored the memory of Harold J. "Duke" Ellington's love and devotion to the swimming pool industry
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Comments  
I would tend toward using 'has' but I know there are many natives who would use 'have', perhaps because an association is a group of many people.
If you are aiming at authentic American English, use "has"; if British, use "have". CJ
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Is British (English) English not 'authentic' ... indeed the MOST 'authentic' ?
Hi jjjdolfan,

English isn't my native Language, but I think you should use "have" once you have in the sentence "Northeast Spa and Pool Association", it means 1 and other that is equal to "they", so "they have" and it isn't "she/he/it has".

Well, just my opnion.Emotion: wink
All varieties are authentic. There is no MOST authentic.
The "authentic" was intended to be within the scope of both clauses.

CJ
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I like British. It is much more proper.
I like British. It is much more proper.

JTT: There is no one form, one dialect, of any language that is inherently superior to another. This is an old canard best relegated to the trash heap.
"JTT: There is no one form, one dialect, of any language that is inherently superior to another"

Thank you for your opinion, but I most heartily disagree.
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