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Hello sir

1. Can we use having, being, having been as subject, object of verb, competent and object of preposition like the way we use simple gerunds?


2. is being considered a gerund or a progressive verb in case of passive voice.

eg. 'Car is being driven' (passive)


Another eg. He hates being lied to- is this in passive ( i know this is gerund but not sure if this is passive since verb here is an action verb not a 'be')

Please with all these queries

Thankyou.

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anonymous1. Can we use having, being, having been as subject, object of verb, competent and object of preposition like the way we use simple gerunds?

Yes. Having been chosen as the representative of my class at the state-wide conference is a great honor for me. The underlined construction is the subject of the sentence.

anonymous2. is being considered a gerund or a progressive verb in case of passive voice.eg. 'The car is being driven' (passive)

"is being driven" is the whole verb phrase. It's the progressive passive of the verb "drive".

anonymousHe hates [being lied to].

The main verb is active (hates). The verb in the complement (in brackets above) is the passive part.

Active gerunds: inviting; saying; taking
Passive gerunds: being invited; being said; being taken

CJ

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Thankyou for your reply.. I still am bit confused.

1. question one- i know that a. "is+being+verb ed" is passive voice but b. if verb that precedes 'being' is an action verb not 'is/linking verb' it would not be considered as passive sentence?

2. in case a. being is progressive verb of passive voice and case b. it is a gerund?


am i getting it right?

anonymous if verb that precedes 'being' is an action verb not 'is/linking verb' it would not be considered as passive sentence?

What sentence are you referring to? Is it the one with "hates"?

He hates [being lied to] is equivalent in structure to He hates [spinach].

Neither one of those is considered a passive sentence. In the first sentence "being lied to" has no auxiliary verb before it, so it's not a tense. It's called a non-finite construction when there's no auxiliary verb.

anonymous2. in case a. being is progressive verb of passive voice and case b. it is a gerund?

a.) is being driven is the full verb phrase. 'being' by itself is called a participle when it occurs in a progressive (continuous) tense like this.

b.) In traditional grammar 'being' in being lied to is called a gerund. Yes.

CJ

Sure CJ, thanks a lot for explaining. Ive one more concern. Please help.

Isn't 'he hates being lied to' /he hates spinach both are simple present tenses in active.

Where being lied to (gerund phrase) is verbs object, Like 'he hates going to the office' (obj -, going to the office ) Gerund phrase.

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anonymous'he hates being lied to' /he hates spinach both are simple present tenses in active.

Yes. "hates" is simple present, active.

anonymousWhere being lied to (gerund phrase) is verbs object, Like 'he hates going to the office' (obj -, going to the office ) Gerund phrase.

Yes. It doesn't matter which -ing word phrase you use after "hates", the grammatical analysis is the same. Traditional grammar may call that phrase an object (a direct object), but the more general term in modern grammar is "complement", so we can also use that terminology and say that "being lied to" or "going to the office" or "fishing on Sundays" (or whatever he hates) is the complement of the main verb "hates".

CJ

Sure thankyou