+0
Hello,

for the following sentence,

1. Having done his homework, Sam goes out for a walk.

(I think it is correct, right?)

How can I change the above sentence to past tense without change the sentences pattern.Should I write:

2. Had done his homework, Sam went out for a walk.

How about for passive voice by using the same pattern? any suggestion?

Thank you!
+0
1. Having done his homework, Sam goes out for a walk.

The tenses don't match.

Past tense: Having done his homework, Sam went out for a walk.

Present tense: 1. Sam does his homework, then goes out for a walk.

The example of Past is passive, to change it to active would be:

Finishing his homework, Sam went out for a walk.
+0
The tenses don't match.
Actually, "having done his homework" is non-finite, so it carries no tense marker. Only the matrix clause has tense.
Also, the original sentence (with present tense) will do in a pinch as a real-time commentary. For example, in a film about baseball, we may be watching a certain series of actions while the unseen narrator explains, as in,
"Having struck out, the batter returns to the dugout in a foul mood."

My guess is that the original poster was not thinking in terms of real-time commentary, however.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  
Use of the same kind of pattern with passive voice:
"Having been seen too often in that location, George decided to move his illegal enterprise to another street corner."

Or with an overt subject for the non-finite clause -- and on the same topic you began with --
"His homework having been done, Sam went out for a walk."

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Having done his work, Sam went out.

Having been proofread, her paper was ready to submitt
Hi, CalifJim, I found this thread just now. Mind if I pick your brain about such usages as well? I have found two sentences online.

The first one is " Having come tantalisingly close to taking off, Brazil has stalled."

My question is would the meaning of this sentence still the same if I changed it to having come tantalisingly close to taking off, Brazil stalled? Could you tell me the difference of the two sentences?

Another one is: " Having taught university students in global affairs, I happened to have several old papers in a drawer."

My question is would it be okay to write like this: having taught university students in global affairs, I have happened to have several old papers in a drawer? And correct me if I'm wrong. You wrote that this kind of form, namely having+past participle, doesn't have tense markers; only the matrix clause has tenses. Is that what you meant? Could you explain it for me. I'd be grateful if you could answer it.

Merry Christmas to you and to all the guys here.