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1) Does "Graham Greene doubted that "anyone but Mr. Yeats can still take his poems very seriously"" mean "Graham Greene did believe in Tagore, saying, "anyone, except Mr. Yeats, can still take his poems very seriously""?


2)Does "We got out three good books, Sturge Moore and I" mean "we published three good books, Sturge's book and Moore's book and my book"?


3)Does " he brought out sentimental rubbish and wrecked his reputation" mean " Tagore published sentimental rubbish and ruined his reputation"?


Background info:


Tagore was deemed over-rated by some. Graham Greene doubted that "anyone but Mr. Yeats can still take his poems very seriously." Several prominent Western admirers—including Pound and, to a lesser extent, even Yeats—criticised Tagore's work. Yeats, unimpressed with his English translations, railed against that "Damn Tagore [...] We got out three good books, Sturge Moore and I, and then, because he thought it more important to know English than to be a great poet, he brought out sentimental rubbish and wrecked his reputation. Tagore does not know English, no Indian knows English."[5][181] William Radice, who "English[ed]" his poems, asked: "What is their place in world literature?"[182] He saw him as "kind of counter-cultur[al]," bearing "a new kind of classicism" that would heal the "collapsed romantic confusion and chaos of the 20th [c]entury."[181][183] The translated Tagore was "almost nonsensical",[184] and subpar English offerings reduced his trans-national appeal:

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1) No, Graham Greene suggested that nobody, apart from Yeats, could still take Tagore's poems very seriously.

2) No, Sturge Moore is one person (appears to be a compound surname). Together or separately, two people published three books.

3) Yes.
Comments  
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(About the (1))
Yeats seriously thinks that Tagore's poems are sentimental rubbish?
a) Does " "English[ed]" his poems" mean "translated Tagore's poems into English"?

b) Does "He saw him as "kind of counter-cultur[al]"" mean "he realized that Tagore was kind of anti-cultural"?
SweetFreedom (About the (1)) Yeats seriously thinks that Tagore's poems are sentimental rubbish?
More background knowledge may be required to fully understand this. As far as I can tell, the "anyone but Mr. Yeats can still take his poems very seriously" part is talking about Yeats' original opinion of Tagore, or his opinion of Tagore's works in the original language. "sentimental rubbish" is his revised opinion of Tagore's later works in English and/or translations into English.
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SweetFreedom a) Does " "English[ed]" his poems" mean "translated Tagore's poems into English"?b) Does "He saw him as "kind of counter-cultur[al]"" mean "he realized that Tagore was kind of anti-cultural"?
a) "Englished" presumably means translated into English, but It is hard to be sure of its intended connotations without knowing more about the original context in which the word was used, from which it is quoted here. With no further information, it sounds rather disparaging to me.

b) "counter-cultural" means relating to or supporting a "counter-culture", which is an alternative culture set up or proposed in opposition to mainstream culture.