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When someone visits, the secretary approaches his boss, saying (1)"He came to see you"
How about saying (2)"He has come to see you"?

Is there any difference of nuances between (1) and (2)?
Does (b) imply that he has been being expected to come?
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When someone visits, the secretary approaches his boss, saying (1)"He came to see you"
How about saying (2)"He has come to see you"?-- OK, feel free!

Is there any difference of nuances between (1) and (2)?-- Just the usual between simple past and present perfect (q.v. in our FAQs Forum).
Does (b) imply that he has been being expected to come?- It could in context, but it does not necessarily do so as given.
Hi,

Much depends on the situation.

Can the visitor hear the secretary's words to the boss?
Ca the boss see the visitor while the secretary is speaking?

Clive
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Thanks a lot, Mister Micawber!!
Clive1. Can the visitor hear the secretary's words to the boss?
2. Can the boss see the visitor while the secretary is speaking?
Thanks so much, Clive!!

About your question....
1. Yes
2. No.

I am wondering what your answer will be....
Hi,

eg There's a gentleman here to see you.

eg There's someone here to see you.

Clive
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Thanks Clive!!

I wanted to know what the difference between "He came to see you" and "He has come to see you" is.

Can there be any situation that natives feel the difference betwen the two, imagining that the situation is between a boss and his secretary?
Hi,

I wanted to know what the difference between "He came to see you" and "He has come to see you" is.

Can there be any situation that natives feel the difference betwen the two, imagining that the situation is between a boss and his secretary?

You mean that you want to ignore the issues of politeness that are involved? And you want to ignore the question of whether the boss knows who 'he ' is? These are big issues to ignore.

He came to see you. Describes a past event. Sounds like he came. and then went away again,

He has come to see you. My first reaction is that it sounds like the boss earlier asked him to come.

Clive.
Oh, thanks a lot, Clive!!

I don't really know what are involved in this.

I just want to know how the natives feel the difference.

I know that grammatically both are possible.

But, I am not sure how the natives receive the two different expressions.

Your explanation, He came to see you. Describes a past event. Sounds like he came. and then went away again,

He has come to see you. My first reaction is that it sounds like the boss earlier asked him to come.

seems to be to the point.

But I guess the natives would use "He came to see you", when the visitor(he) is still in the office waiting for the boss(you).
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