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Hi all,
Let's say we have the following verbs for He, She or It:

HE/SHE/IT LIKES
HE/SHE/IT DOES

But if we change the verb to it's negative form:

HE/SHE/IT DOES NOT LIKE

LIKES is no longer appropriate. Is there any explanation why this is so?

Thanks!
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In "he/she/it does not like it", "do" is used as an auxiliary verb and needs to be followed by a bare infinitive, in this case "like".
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I know this is an old post, but here's the rule.

After auxiliary do (do, does, did) you must use the plain form of the verb (dictionary form; uninflected form; bare infinitive).

CJ

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Comments  
Of course, although not always you´ve got an explanation for everything. Do is an auxiliar verb, so it auxiliate you, that is because he bear the -es, the negative form, etc. and the original verb, as like is liberated from its burden. I hope that is useful for you.

"He doesn't liked to like you" is grammatically correct

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

No, it's not.

He doesn't liked is not a valid English tense.

Perhaps you mean

eg He doesn't like

or

eg He didn't like

Clive

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.