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Chris pleaded with his sister not to tell their parents he failded/had failed English.

Would you use "failed" or "had failed" in the above? Do they make any difference in meaning? Thanks.
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No difference in meaning, really. The past perfect roots the failure distinctly earlier than the telling of it, but it's not necessary here.
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Hi,

Chris pleaded with his sister not to tell their parents he failded/had failed English.

Would you use "failed" or "had failed" in the above? Do they make any difference in meaning?

They'd normally be taken to mean the same, but the Past Perfect makes the sequence very clear.

It's not impossible that you could have a situation where Chris is talking to his sister on Wedneday about an exam that he will do on Thursday and which he knows he will fail. ie 'Don't tell my parents on Friday that I failed tomorrow'.

Best wishes, Clive
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Mister MicawberNo difference in meaning, really. The past perfect roots the failure distinctly earlier than the telling of it, but it's not necessary here.

Thanks, Mister and Clive.

Got it.

As a small aside, what does "roots" in the above refer to? It's very interesting because I've never run across "root" used this way.
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there is no such word as failded!!!
This is the meaning I am using, Anglo:

Root (v) 19. to implant or establish deeply: Good manners were rooted in him like a second nature.

I would use failed personally cause' had failed makes it should older than it is Only my opinion Emotion: smile

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without punctuation this is impossible to understand.