I just looked up "afraid" in the Cambridge dictionary. It insists afraid is an "adjective".
The sentence they provide slips in an adverb:
He felt suddently afraid.
Yet, how is that different than:
He felt afraid.
It seems to me that "afraid" is being used as
an "adjective" as in how did he "FEEL".
Help me ... how the heck is afraid an adjective in this sentence from the Cambridge dictionary.
Tammy
1 2
I just looked up "afraid" in the Cambridge dictionary. It insists afraid is an "adjective". The sentence they provide slips in an adverb: He felt suddently afraid.

The adverb "suddenly" modifies the adjective "afraid".
Yet, how is that different than: He felt afraid.

Here, there is no adverb modifying the adjective "afraid".
It seems to me that "afraid" is being used as an "adjective" as in how did he "FEEL".

It is indeed being used as an adjective.
Help me ... how the heck is afraid an adjective in this sentence from the Cambridge dictionary.

The same way it is an adjective in the simpler sentence you constructed. Modification of an adjective by an adverb does not change the adjective into some other part of speech.

Mike Nitabach
I just looked up "afraid" in the Cambridge dictionary. It insists afraid is an "adjective". The sentence they provide slips ... did he "FEEL". Help me ... how the heck is afraid an adjective in this sentence from the Cambridge dictionary.

Many verbs take an adjective complement:
He was afraid.
He felt afraid.
He felt happy.
He called me stupid.
Note the difference between:
He left happy (= was happy when he left)
He left happily (= was happy to leave)
The contrast is made compactly in R. L. Stevenson's line:

Glad did I live and gladly die

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
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I just looked up "afraid" in the Cambridge dictionary. It ... they provide slips in an adverb: He felt suddently afraid.

The adverb "suddenly" modifies the adjective "afraid".

Quash me if I am wrong, Mike, but doesn't "suddenly" modify the verb "felt"? You could say, "He felt suddenly happy, anxious, elated, bla bla adjective of choice. Suddenly he felt something. Seems to me if the adverb were modifying "afraid," it would be something like deeply, slightly, vividly, keenly, stupidly, jarringly (is that a word?) etc.. Is "suddenly" modifying the verb phrase "felt afraid"?
Yet, how is that different than: He felt afraid.

Here, there is no adverb modifying the adjective "afraid".

He was not afraid, but something happened and in an instant, he became afraid. "He felt afraid" could mean he was always afraid, he was afraid last night, yesterday, last week, when he was a kid, when he got married, etc.. We really don't know. The addition of "suddenly" tells us when he "felt afraid."

Susan
The adverb "suddenly" modifies the adjective "afraid".

Quash me if I am wrong, Mike, but doesn't "suddenly" modify the verb "felt"? You could say, "He felt suddenly ... like deeply, slightly, vividly, keenly, stupidly, jarringly (is that a word?) etc.. Is "suddenly" modifying the verb phrase "felt afraid"?

The sentence can be parsed either way.

Mike Nitabach
It's a poorly written sentence. As it is written, the implication is that one can feel "suddenly afraid". I don't know how that could happen. I would expect that the person "suddenly felt" afraid, as that makes a lot more sense. The "suddenly" then does indeed apply to the "feel".
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Quash me if I am wrong, Mike, but doesn't "suddenly" ... The addition of "suddenly" tells us when he "felt afraid."

It's a poorly written sentence. As it is written, the implication is that one can feel "suddenly afraid". I don't ... person "suddenly felt" afraid, as that makes a lot more sense. The "suddenly" then does indeed apply to the "feel".

You step off the curb and a hitherto unseen car blows by you with inches to spare. You just experienced sudden fear. In other words, you were suddenly afraid.

Mike Nitabach
It's a poorly written sentence. As it is written, the ... sense. The "suddenly" then does indeed apply to the "feel".

You step off the curb and a hitherto unseen car blows by you with inches to spare. You just experienced sudden fear. In other words, you were suddenly afraid.

Good example. I see it now.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
The adverb "suddenly" modifies the adjective "afraid".

Quash me if I am wrong, Mike, but doesn't "suddenly" modify the verb "felt"?

No. For it to do so the sentence would need to be rewritten "He suddenly felt afraid."
You could say, "He felt suddenly happy, anxious, elated, bla bla adjective of choice. Suddenly he felt something. Seems to ... like deeply, slightly, vividly, keenly, stupidly, jarringly (is that a word?) etc.. Is "suddenly" modifying the verb phrase "felt afraid"?

No, it is not. If it was, it would be placed in front of it or after it.
Compare:
"He felt deeply afraid".
In this sentence, you do not mean to say "he felt deeply" and "he felt afraid". You mean to say he felt very afraid.
This is how adverbs work. Their place in the sentence is not as flexible as first appears.
Here, there is no adverb modifying the adjective "afraid".

He was not afraid, but something happened and in an instant, he became afraid. "He felt afraid" could mean he ... kid, when he got married, etc.. We really don't know. The addition of "suddenly" tells us when he "felt afraid."

If you write "suddenly felt afraid".
This could mean that the source of fear had existed for some time, but only at this point did he feel afraid. If you write "felt suddenly afraid" you emphasise the suddenness of the fear. It strongly implies that the source of the fear has not existed for some time.
It is indeed being used as an adjective. The same ... adjective into some other part of speech. Mike Nitabach

Susan

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