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Hello teachers,

I have a question, please. I've heard such a sentence from an English native speaker, who was talking about his friend on YouTube:

1. He has me watch a lot of movies.

If it was correct, what would be the tense? Does it mean that usually, he watches a lot of movies with his friend (present)? or did the speaker already watch a lot of movies with his friend? (past)

I made up the rest:

2. He has me watched a lot of movies.

3. He had me watch a lot of movies.

4. He had me watched a lot of movies.

5. I have her look after my turtle.

6. Mary has Tom look after her cat.

7. Mary has Tom to look after her cat.

8. Mary has Tom looking after her cat.

Are they correct grammatically and as a meaning?

I hope I don't confuse your mind.


Thank you

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This is the verb "have" in its causative sense.

HAVE as a causative verb. Meanings

  • Give someone else the responsibility to do something or
  • give an order for someone to do something or
  • require someone to do something

Grammatical structure:

HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form)
HAVE + OBJECT (noun / pronoun) + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB


Examples of grammatical structure #1:

  • I’ll have my assistant call you to reschedule the appointment.
  • The businessman had his secretary make copies of the report.
  • The teacher had all the students read ten pages of their book.

Examples of grammatical structure #2:

  • I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow.
  • We’re having our car fixed by the mechanic this weekend.
  • Bob had his teeth whitened; his smile looks great!
  • My washing machine is broken; I need to have it repaired.

So some of your sentences are correct, and some are not correct. Do you know which ones are OK?

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Moonrise1. He has me watch a lot of movies.

Correct. The verb "have" is in the present tense.

Moonrise3. He had me watch a lot of movies.

Correct. The verb "have" is in the past tense.

Other tenses are also commonly used, for example:

He is having me watch a lot of movies.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
+1

For a discussion of the differences between "have someone do something" and "have someone doing something", see -ing.

CJ

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AlpheccaStars

This is the verb "have" in its causative sense.

HAVE as a causative verb. Meanings

  • Give someone else the responsibility to do something or
  • give an order for someone to do something or
  • require someone to do something

Grammatical structure:

HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form)
HAVE + OBJECT (noun / pronoun) + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB


Examples of grammatical structure #1:

  • I’ll have my assistant call you to reschedule the appointment.
  • The businessman had his secretary make copies of the report.
  • The teacher had all the students read ten pages of their book.

Examples of grammatical structure #2:

  • I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow.
  • We’re having our car fixed by the mechanic this weekend.
  • Bob had his teeth whitened; his smile looks great!
  • My washing machine is broken; I need to have it repaired.

So some of your sentences are correct, and some are not correct. Do you know which ones are OK?

Hi, How is it going? You've been absent for a long time. Are you okay?

Thank you for the clear answer. I think I can identify the correct sentences now.

2. He has me watched a lot of movies. (Wrong) In fact, it might seem correct, but as meaning, I don't think so. I could say, "He has his Movies watched by a lot of people." Or "He has me watch a lot of movies".

3. He had me watch a lot of movies. (Correct)

4. He had me watched a lot of movies. (Wrong)

5. I have her look after my turtle. (Correct)

6. Mary has Tom look after her cat. (Correct)

7. Mary has Tom to look after her cat. (Wrong)

8. Mary has Tom looking after her cat. (Correct)

CalifJim

For a discussion of the differences between "have someone do something" and "have someone doing something", see -ing .

CJ

Thanks a lot for the link. It's very helpful actually. The ING form's meaning was totally different from what I thought. I think I get it, but I want to make sure of something. Regarding the following quote:

"In the 'have someone doING something' pattern, the subject of the main clause exerts effort in training, instructing, coaching, coaxing, or more generally influencing the subject of the second clause so that the second subject acquires the ability or willingness to perform the desired action. There is the implication that some period of influence occurs before the time of the action expressed in the sentence. This pattern is somewhat equivalent to 'did something to or for someone that caused that someone to do - or be able to do - something (else)'. (!)"

and the example:

"I had water dripping out of the AC." (You used a radiator, I changed it.)

I know this is non-causative, but I'm wondering does it necessarily mean that you've done some sort of influence before the time of the incident. I mean I know there should be a previous influence, but it might not relate to you or your actions. For example, dripping water could happen as a result of accumulated dust. (External factor)

But when it happens due to an error in the installation of the AC, I could say that you've done some influence before.

The bottom line is that it's not always a person's influence. Am I correct?


Thank you

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MoonriseI had water dripping out of the AC.
I know this is non-causative, but I'm wondering does it necessarily mean that you've done some sort of influence before the time of the incident.

No. Those are non-causative. They use "experiential have". They say what happened that you noticed or something that happened to you. They are different from the ones that show influence. It's a different use of 'have'.

I had a man come up to me yesterday and ask for help changing a tire.
A salesclerk I know had a customer try to steal some jewelry right in front of her.

CJ

CalifJim
MoonriseI had water dripping out of the AC.
I know this is non-causative, but I'm wondering does it necessarily mean that you've done some sort of influence before the time of the incident.

No. Those are non-causative. They use "experiential have". They say what happened that you noticed or something that happened to you. They are different from the ones that show influence. It's a different use of 'have'.

I had a man come up to me yesterday and ask for help changing a tire.
A salesclerk I know had a customer try to steal some jewelry right in front of her.

CJ

I noticed that you used both forms. Does it mean that only context can tell which type of "have" is being used? If so, this rule would be subjective, right?

I'm wondering, though, why didn't you use ing form in the second example? It sounds correct to my ear.

A salesclerk I know had a customer trying to steal some jewelry right in front of her.


Thank you very much

MoonriseI'm wondering, though, why didn't you use ing form in the second example? It sounds correct to my ear.

It is an experience that occurred in the past.

It is not subjunctive mood.

The progressive can be used.

He is having so many problems dealing with his sons that he is thinking about sending them to boarding school.

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