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We're in a parking garage:

He backs into the wall. He then slams the car in first gear and tears/screeches off along the wall.


Two questions:

1. Is "along" the correct word if he drives off next to the wall following it?

2. Does it sound wrong to write... "He... tears off/screeches off..." instead of using the car as the main subject or is it OK as long as we know he's in a car?

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We're in a parking garage:

He backs into the wall.<< < This sound like he hits the wall. Is that what you mean?

He then slams the car in first gear and tears/screeches off along the wall. <<< The meaning of this isn't clear to me. eg Aren't there any other cars parked facing the wall? Try to say it another way.


Two questions:

1. Is "along" the correct word if he drives off next to the wall following it?

2. Does it sound wrong to write... "He... tears off/screeches off..." instead of using the car as the main subject or is it OK as long as we know he's in a car? That's OK.

Comments  
anonymous1. Is "along" the correct word if he drives off next to the wall following it?

Maybe, but not yet. He is still perpendicular the wall with a crushed rear.

anonymous2. Does it sound wrong to write... "He... tears off/screeches off..." instead of using the car as the main subject or is it OK as long as we know he's in a car?

"Screeches off" is good. By the way, "he slams it into first" gets you there. "Slams it in first" is unidiomatic.

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
CliveHe backs into the wall.<< < This sound like he hits the wall. Is that what you mean?

Yes.

CliveHe then slams the car in first gear and tears/screeches off along the wall. <<< Th meaning of this isn't clear to me. eg Aren't there any other cars parked facing the wall?

Probably, but can't find another way to describe which direction he goes.

anonymous"Screeches off" is good. By the way, "he slams it into first" gets you there. "Slams it in first" is unidiomatic.

What if the sentence was "He slams it in/into reverse", should it also be "into"? Thank you.

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anonymousWhat if the sentence was "He slams it in/into reverse", should it also be "into"?

Yes. It gets complicated when I think about it. I can put it in first, but I can't slam it in first. Don't ask me why.

He then screeches off along the wall.<<< The meaning of this isn't clear to me. eg Aren't there any other cars parked facing the wall?

Probably, but can't find another way to describe which direction he goes. You can't leave it the way it is. Say it another way.

eg He then screeches off towards the exit.

eg Then he speeds away.

Clive