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Person A: Who is he?

Person B: He is family.

Is the sentence he is family correct?

In the expression he is family, there is no object. Doesn't sentence consist of both subject and object?
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Comments  
I didn't undestand what it is meant by " he is family" let alone subject- object discussion.
DollI didn't undestand what it is meant by " he is family" let alone subject- object discussion.

Hi Doll,

Perhaps by he is family person B means that he is part of the family. What do you say now?

And what does let alone subject-object discussion mean?
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I don't want t make any comment on the first question. As for the second one, I mean I didn't understand the main point, I didn't understand what that phrase mean so before understanding it, don't expect me to answer your question about the subject and object.

Also see this: Main Entry: let alone
Function: conjunction
: to say nothing of : not to mention -- used especially to emphasize the improbability of a contrasting example <he would never walk again let alone play golf -- Sports Illus.> <how many ever see an Ambassador or Minister, let alone a President -- Robert

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=let+alone
My try: (my comments are in deep pink)
Jackson6612Person A: Who is he?

Person B: He is family.

Is the sentence he is family correct? -----Yes. And I guess it means he is a member of person-B's family.

In the expression he is family, there is no object. Doesn't a sentence consist of both a subject and an object?

In "he is family", he is the subject; is, the linking verb; and family, the predicative.

It's the same pattern with "She's pretty", "You are young", etc..
MapleMy try: (my comments are in deep pink)
Jackson6612Person A: Who is he?

Person B: He is family.

Is the sentence he is family correct? -----Yes. And I guess it means he is a member of person-B's family.

In the expression he is family, there is no object. Doesn't a sentence consist of both a subject and an object?

In "he is family", he is the subject; is, the linking verb; and family, the predicative.

It's the same pattern with "She's pretty", "You are young", etc..

Hi Maple,

So, do you mean he is family isn't a sentence?

Best wishes, Jackson
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So, do you mean he is family isn't a sentence?
Hi,

I didn't say "he is family" is not a sentence.

"He is family" IS a sentence, (though maybe someone would argue its semantic ambiguity.)

The following examples are all sentences.

She is pretty. (Pretty is an adj, functioning as a predicative. Is is the linking verb.)

You are young. (Young is an adj, functioning as a predicative.)

Mary is a rheumatic. (Rheumatic is a noun here. A rheumatic functions as a predicative.)

He ran.

He kicked a ball. (He, the subject; kick, the predicative verb; a ball, the object of the transitive verb kick.)

Some books would take "is pretty", "kicked the ball", etc. as a whole as the predicate of the sentence.

And NOT every sentence consists of an object of the main verb. Because, you know, some verbs are intransitive, and there are also linking verbs.
family

noun: a person having kinship with another or others
Example: "He's family"
Hi, Linguaphile,

Your definition seems sensible.[Y][C]

But a question has been triggered by it.

Is family uncountable or countable while it means "a person having kinship with another or others"?

Thanks for any comments!
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