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He ___ (lived/has lived) in London for three years, but he lives in America now.

He ___(went/has been) to London three times, but he is back in America now.

Which is right? I can't simply make sense of the diffeences between the past tense and the present perfect tense.
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"He has lived in London for three years" implies that he still lives there, which is not the case. So, it must be "He lived ...".

In the second sentence, "He has been" brings the relevance of those visits more closely into the present. With "He went", the visits seem more like past history. To me, the contrast with "but" works better with "He has been", but "went" is not impossible.
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He lived (past) in London for three year, but he lives in America now.
He went (past) to London three times, but he is back in America now.

Present Perfect tense - reflects to things you start at the past and still working now.
example : He has lived in London since three years ago. (and now, he still lives in London)
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wangqh2696122He ___ (lived/has lived) in London for three years, but he lives in America now.

He ___(went/has been) to London three times, but he is back in America now.

Which is right? I can't simply make sense of the diffeences between the past tense and the present perfect tense.

Hi,

1. He lived in London................

2. He has been to London............. The sentence means he visited London three times and at present he is in America.
wangqh2696122 He lived (past) in London for three year, but he lives in America now.

He went (past) to London three times, but he is back in America now.

Present Perfect tense - reflects to things you start at the past and still working now.

example : He has lived in London since three years ago. (and now, he still lives in London)

'Since' must be used with perfect continuous tense only..........not with present perfect tense.....

Thanks.

 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi.

wangqh2696122 wrote these sentences in the original post:

He ___ (lived/has lived) in London for three years, but he lives in America now.

He ___(went/has been) to London three times, but he is back in America now.

As for the first sentence, if "He has lived in London for three years, but he lives in America now" is incorrect (as I believe you seem to have said), then would you say this is correct or incorrect? Let us pretend the letters "XXX" and "YYY" represent some companies.

He has worked for XXX for three years and now he works for YYY.

If the above sentence is correct, what is the difference between the sentence (the first sentence, that is) by wangqh2696122 and the above sentence?
AnonymousHe has worked for XXX for three years and now he works for YYY.
In this scenario it's normally better to say "He worked for XXX for three years".

"He has worked for XXX for three years" sounds as if he still works there.
Personally I think it is a little rude to say "He has lived...", or "I have lived..."
The "has" in the "he has lived" emphasis on declaring that the person was there for _____
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
If you say "he lived..." fast, is spoken in a much more friendly tone.
Then if you say "he has lived..." slowly.
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