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what is difference between these two sentences
He might come. or he may come .
thanks
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Comments  (Page 8) 
<"And MissQ may be coming to the party, as well."
"Wonderful! And it's definitely 'may be coming', not 'might be coming'?"
"Absolutely."
How often do you hear that kind of exchange? >

Frequency is not a problem. Such exchanges do occur, don't they?
If you will allow me a tiny interruption, No! Such exchanges do not occur in American English! I'm beginning to wonder which foreign language you two are discussing! The very idea of something being definitely may and not mightis positively daft, as you blokes say. Emotion: smile

CJ
<Such exchanges do not occur in American English! I'm beginning to wonder which foreign language you two are discussing!>

Are you saying that if it doesn't happen in AE, then it must be a foreign language? I get from your statement "It can't be English if it doesn't occur in AE".

And sorry, but in BE, such an exchange is possible:

Son: Mum, you know Dad and you said I may be allowed to go to the Shaz' party this weekend? Well, I was thinking I could stay over and then you wouldn't have to...

Mum: Wait a sec. We said we MIGHT let you go.

From the good 'ole AHD:

may and might. It may rain. It might rain. What’s the difference? Just as could is the past tense of can, might is the past tense of may: We thought we might win the tournament. But might can also be used as a substitute for may to show diminished possibility. Thus, saying We might go to the movies means that the likelihood of going is somewhat less than if you say We may go to the movies. When used to express permission, might has a higher degree of politeness than may. Thus, Might I express my opinion conveys less insistence than May I express my opinion.
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What's happening here? Why the change from one modal to another?

Not the full list, or any code list of what you may or might want to have in the future, but just those that your LECC agrees are in the "must carry" category now; i.e., all there deem these will be carried and they will be automated carry in applicable stations. All the rest of the Event Codes are in the "discretionary carry" category.

http://eas.oes.ca.gov/Pages/easplan.htm

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http://www.searchhelp.com/Content/Support/Policies.aspx?cat=66

Depending on the project, you may or might not have to have a staging database.

http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=443594&seqNum=2&rl=1

A few months ago, as you may or might know, The Viral Spiral had a substandard issue with Spamhaus and Spamcop thus crippling my newsletter for many months.

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Intentional nuances?

If so, then fatality rates per 1000 workers may not might not be comparable across states.

http://www.drake.edu/cbpa/econ/boal/acc.pdf#search=%22%22may%20not%20might%20not%22%22

In any case, our laundry is done, trailer topped off and we're ready to move on out.
There may not might not be any articles for a day or two because I don't know whether we'll get anywhere near an Internet hookup.

http://www.resortsbc.com/Wilderness-AdventuresJun2-06.html

Only error there is missing commas - depending on your view of punctuation.

And, on being explicit:

We reach this conclusion despite the fact that, as defendant observes, the prosecutor in one reference emphasized the mandatory wording of the statutory instruction. He told the jury it would be instructed that "'if you conclude that the aggravating evidence outweighs the mitigating evidence, you shall return a death sentence.' [¶] Shall, not may, not might, not maybe. It is very explicit.

http://online.ceb.com/CalCases/C3/42C3d1222.htm
Perhaps a moderator will move this to the linguistics forum.

And perhaps someone who cares more about this will create a poll that asks us how great a difference we see in "he may" vs. "he might." I'm thinking that outside the people posting so vociferously on this tread, it will be over 90% responding "not much."
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<And perhaps someone who cares more about this will create a poll that asks us how great a difference we see in "he may" vs. "he might." I'm thinking that outside the people posting so vociferously on this tread, it will be over 90% responding "not much.">

You've had plenty of opportunity to state your opinion. Why do you come in at such a late hour to do so? And, it's the "not much" that is of interest to this poster, if that's OK with you, GG.

I too hope this is moved to the linguistics forum. Then, discussions over minimal differences in usage can be discussed by those who are free to do so and who are not criticised for doing so.

Also, when you state that "not much", are you referring to every genre and/or register where those two modals are found?

I repost:

And, on being explicit:

"We reach this conclusion despite the fact that, as defendant observes, the prosecutor in one reference emphasized the mandatory wording of the statutory instruction. He told the jury it would be instructed that "'if you conclude that the aggravating evidence outweighs the mitigating evidence, you shall return a death sentence.' [¶] Shall, not may, not might, not maybe. It is very explicit."

http://online.ceb.com/CalCases/C3/42C3d1222.htm
Milky<Such exchanges do not occur in American English! I'm beginning to wonder which foreign language you two are discussing!>

Are you saying that if it doesn't happen in AE, then it must be a foreign language? I get from your statement "It can't be English if it doesn't occur in AE".

And sorry, but in BE, such an exchange is possible:

Son: Mum, you know Dad and you said I may be allowed to go to the Shaz' party this weekend? Well, I was thinking I could stay over and then you wouldn't have to...

Mum: Wait a sec. We said we MIGHT let you go.

This exchange is also possible, in British English:


Son: "Purple gonads elusively copulate with ambiguous protases."

Mother: "Only on Tuesdays."
But it has happened perhaps only slightly more often than your "Shaz" exchange.

MrP
Why not spend your online time in more productive manner? For example, in explaining such as this:

"We reach this conclusion despite the fact that, as defendant observes, the prosecutor in one reference emphasized the mandatory wording of the statutory instruction. He told the jury it would be instructed that "'if you conclude that the aggravating evidence outweighs the mitigating evidence, you shall return a death sentence.' [¶] Shall, not may, not might, not maybe. It is very explicit."
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What is there to explain? The prosecutor simply listed words that contrast with "shall". He might equally have said:


"Shall: not "can return a death sentence", not "ought to return a death sentence", not "should return a death sentence", not "possibly will decide to return a death sentence", not "probably will eventually with some regret have a vote about whether to return a death sentence", etc.
His point was that "shall" has prescriptive force, in the if-statement; whereas "may", "might", etc. would not have.

MrP
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