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(1) He allegedly defamed a police officer torturing him.

(2) He allegedly defamed a police officer tortured him.

(3) He allegedly defamed a police officer he said tortured him

I suppose (1) is correct and (2) is incorrect because present participles should be used for active voice. But why (2) plus "he said" (i.e. (3)) becomes correct again?

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Your reasons aren't correct.

Sentence 1 is incorrect.

He allegedly defamed a police officer for torturing him.

Sentence 2 needs "who" or "that" as a subject for "tortured."

He allegedly defamed a police officer who tortured him.

Sentence 3 is correct because the clause "he said tortured him" describes or modifies "officer." You could say the following, though many people might avoid the use of "whom":

He allegedly defamed a police officer whom he said tortured him. (In the example you provide, the clause is reduced, eliminating "whom."

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Thanks for replying. But are you sure about the use of whom, instead who? I would like to learn more about the nature of something like "somebody said/say" in the middle of sentence.

Based on what you said, the title of the book "Was Jesus Who He Said He Was" is grammatically incorrect.

Will Leung 8544sure about the use of whom, instead who?

Actually, it's 'who', not 'whom'.

Will Leung 8544Based on what you said, the title of the book "Was Jesus Who He Said He Was" is grammatically incorrect.

No, not at all. You just remove the somewhat parenthetical "he said".

who he was is grammatical. whom he was is not grammatical.

These are the indirect question forms of the questions Who was he? and Whom was he? You have learned that Whom was he is wrong, haven't you?

If you just remove the parenthetical words and make the agreement with the words that are left, you should be able to do this. Try these, and I can check them for you.

He was not the person who/whom I thought had stolen the pastries.
This is the boss who/whom Susan claims the customer had insulted.
Were they the salesmen who/whom Phillip insisted were lost?

CJ


Oops. Sorry. I mistook this for a continuation of another very similar post you had on this topic. I didn't even notice that someone else had answered until I had written my answer. Emotion: embarrassed

Here's a link to the correct thread:

See Who/whom he said

Thanks a lot.

He was not the person who/whom I thought had stolen the pastries.
This is the boss who/whom Susan claims the customer had insulted.
Were they the salesmen who/whom Phillip insisted were lost?

Assuming that I am correct, then my example should also be :

He allegedly defamed the officer who he said tortured him.

which is similar to the way you replied me in the other post. Am I right?

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Will Leung 8544

He was not the person who/whom I thought had stolen the pastries.
This is the boss who/whom Susan claims the customer had insulted.
Were they the salesmen who/whom Phillip insisted were lost?

Assuming that I am correct, then my example should also be :

He allegedly defamed the officer who he said tortured him.

which is similar to the way you replied me in the other post. Am I right?

Correct, correct, correct. Very well done.

Now for the big surprise. In most contexts like these, we don't use 'whom' even when it is the correct form. We always use 'who' except in very formal writing and speeches. The use of 'whom' is dropping out of the English language. The only time we use 'whom' is when it is after a preposition (and when it is required in an English course).

Is she the lady from whom you said they stole the money?

But in more casual speech and writing:

Is she the lady who you said they stole the money from?

CJ

That really is a suprise to me! Thank you very much !

Emotion: yes

CJ

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