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He seems to have walked/walk a long way in the sun.

Which makes more sense in the above sample, have walked or walk? Thanks.
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Walked.
RuslanaWalked.

Thanks, Ruslana.

Do you mean "have walked?" Would you like to explain in a few words the reason?

By the way, I'm intriqued in your signature line.What does the bolded part in facial value? I keep six honest serving-men (They taught me all I knew); ...
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Yes, I mean "have walked". It's perfect infinitive: to have + past participle. You use it when you want to point out a time difference between a certain moment and a moment stated in the perfect infinitive form.

Applied to your sentence, it means:

He seems to have walked a long way in the sun.
He seems - a certain present moment. To have walked - he has already walked a long way, which means this action has already happened in the past. So, the action (his walk) is prior to the moment in which "he seems".

I don't know whether I'm clear, but if you could see your sentence written in another way, perhaps, it would make it clearer:

It seems that he has walked a long way in the sun.

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Thanks, Ruslana.

Roger!

By the way, does serving-men in your signature line refer to servants?
Oh, sorry I didn't answer this in my previous post. Yes, serving-men are servants. Emotion: smile
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RuslanaOh, sorry I didn't answer this in my previous post. Yes, serving-men are servants. Emotion: smile
Thanks, Ruslana.

Roger!

One more by the way, is "Roger!" used properly in this situation?
Well, I myself have never used that word, but I reckon it's okay.
RuslanaWell, I myself have never used that word, but I reckon it's okay.
Thanks, Ruslana.
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