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1. He has been standing up for half an hour.

2. He has been sitting down for half an hour.

Are the above sentences acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.
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Comments  
Teo
1. He has been standing up for half an hour.

2. He has been sitting down for half an hour.

Are the above sentences acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.
I would eliminate the 'up' and 'down'. They are used to describe the actual process of changing position.
Yes. "Stand up" & "sit down" refer to actions, but which are very short in themselves.
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Philip
Teo
The differences are fairly small and subtle, but here's what I feel.

I would eliminate the 'up' and 'down'. They are used to describe the actual process of changing position.
1. I want you standing up when the judge enters the court. You never stand up when the judge comes in. This time you'd better remember. To me, there's a hint of exasperation.

2. I want you to stand up when the judge enters the court. A pretty neutral way to say it.

3. I want you to be standing up when the judge enters the court. I want you to stand up before the judge enters the court.

Would you eliminate up of sentence #3?

Thank you very much for your reply.
Hi,

1. He has been standing up for half an hour.

2. He has been sitting down for half an hour.

Both of these seem fine to me. I think 'stand up, sit down' can be used for an action and also to describe a state, as can the words 'stand, sit'.

I think the function of these words is to add emphasis.

He gave his seat on the bus to the pregnant woman because he didn't like to see her standing up. When she was sitting down, she felt a lot more comfortable.

Best wishes, Clive


1. I want you standing up when the judge enters the court. You never stand up when the judge comes in. This time you'd better remember. To me, there's a hint of exasperation.

2. I want you to stand up when the judge enters the court. A pretty neutral way to say it.

3. I want you to be standing up when the judge enters the court. I want you to stand up before the judge enters the court.

Would you eliminate up of sentence #3?

Hello Teo

I agree about the hint of exasperation in #1; but "I want" also contributes to that. (Cf. "I would like you to be standing up when the judge comes in" – rather mild.) It suggests that the act of standing up preceded the judge's entrance.

#2 still sounds a little "robust" to me: you wouldn't say it to someone you considered your equal. It suggests that the act of standing up should accompany the judge's entrance.

#3 as #1. I would probably keep "up".

Cf. the court official's phrase "Please be upstanding!" before the judge comes in.

MrP

PS: Like Clive, I find "stand up" and "sit down" acceptable in a stative sense.
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1. He has moved to London for two years.

2. He has gone to London for two years.

How about these two sentences? Are they acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.
Hi,

They seem fine to me.

Clive
1. He has moved to London for two years.

A professor of English says that #1 is semantically odd.

The correct version is

It has been/ is two years since he moved to London.

Do you agree?

Thank you very much for your reply.
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