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Which of the following sentences is correct?

A.) Joan eats faster than him.

B.) Joan eats faster than he.
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Technically (as you'll see if you read the thread), b is correct. But it's just about never heard. Either say "faster than him" in common, spoken English, or "than he does" for more formal writing.
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See my posting here:
Taller than (he, him, he is)
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I appreciate your response, Marius, but you did not awnser my question.
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
AnonymousI appreciate your response, Marius, but you did not awnser my question.
Oh, I did in that thread, where I mentioned:
"Still a big fight. "
Both are correct to one camp or another. Why should I commit? I am using them as I please, when I please, and not always in the same way.
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B.) Joan eats faster than he.
 to figure out simply transfer the verb (or in this case you can you does) and you can figure out him versus he
 >>> Joan eats faster than he does (eats) NOT Joan east faster than him does (eats) 
Grammar wants 'Joan eats faster than he (eats)' but common usage is '..than him.'

Just as "Who's there?" requires "It's I." But that sounds very stuffy, nowadays - everyone I knows says "It's me."
B is correct.

The way to determine this is to always complete the sentence in your head:

Joan eats faster than he (eats).

It would be wrong to say Joan eats faster than him eats.
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According to my understanding, the answer A is correct because the status of "him" here is an object, but the answer B would be correct if we add the word "does" after he, and the whole sentence would be "Joan eats faster than he does". The further explanation of this sentence is "Joan eats and he eats, but Joan eats faster than he does. Hopefully this explanation makes sense to you.

Cheers,
MW.
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