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Do you use structures such as these in your daily speech?



  1. He won’t be late, I don’t think.



  2. She was an outstanding leader was Mrs Ghandi.



  3. Jill likes rock, myself folk.



  4. That house in Barry St, is that where they live?



  5. That letter wants to go first class.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Only #4.
MilkyThe differences in the way we natives really use English are a bit scary. Many times, they seem not reflect the answers we give to students here.
I don't think so. I consistently say that when people speak casually in conversation, they don't plan out what they will say, so they change their mind or their direction, and you end up with conversations that are not grammatical. And we often remind people here that what you HEAR is not necessarily correct Engish. When we write, we make more of an effort to consisteny apply the rules of standard Engish. And I don't wish to engage in a debate over what standard English is. That's been done to death.
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MilkyAnd how about answering the topic question, Forbes?
I was going to, but Nona said it all for me.
Milky
What's all this "if I were" stuff?

Context, probably.


The differences in the way we natives really use English are a bit scary. Many times, they seem not reflect the answers we give to students here.

The original question related to whether we used particular structures in our daily speech. It's not unreasonable to prefer not to use certain phrases or structures. (They come out of our own mouths and tongues, after all.)

When people answer questions, however, they may well put aside their personal preferences. I wouldn't myself use "myself" in the way you suggest; but that doesn't mean I wouldn't describe how other people use it.

So the discrepancy between "use" and "answers" isn't necessarily negative.

MrP
<When we write, we make more of an effort to consisteny apply the rules of standard Engish. And I don't wish to engage in a debate over what standard English is. That's been done to death.>

But it might be useful for you to get involved in a debate over the differences between written and spoken grammar. Or are you saying that the spoken word, conversation, etc, lacks grammar? If so, please give me your definition of grammar.
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<When people answer questions, however, they may well put aside their personal preferences.>

But personal preferences are exactly what I was asking about. I wasn't asking for "if I were a carpenter" responses.
I already did.
Grammar GeekI consistently say that when people speak casually in conversation, they don't plan out what they will say, so they change their mind or their direction, and you end up with conversations that are not grammatical. And we often remind people here that what you HEAR is not necessarily correct Engish.
Milky
<When people answer questions, however, they may well put aside their personal preferences.>

But personal preferences are exactly what I was asking about. I wasn't asking for "if I were a carpenter" responses.

BOGOF

MrP
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Grammar GeekI already did.
Grammar GeekI consistently say that when people speak casually in conversation, they don't plan out what they will say, so they change their mind or their direction, and you end up with conversations that are not grammatical. And we often remind people here that what you HEAR is not necessarily correct Engish.

So if we plan our conversations beforehand we can avoid the ungrammticality that pervades, in your mind, many, many daily conversations, right?
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