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Do you use structures such as these in your daily speech?



  1. He won’t be late, I don’t think.



  2. She was an outstanding leader was Mrs Ghandi.



  3. Jill likes rock, myself folk.



  4. That house in Barry St, is that where they live?



  5. That letter wants to go first class.
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Comments  
MilkyDo you use structures such as these in your daily speech?



  1. He won’t be late, I don’t think. Yes, when I want to backtrack a little and remind the listener that's it's just my opinion and not a statement of fact.



  2. She was an outstanding leader was Mrs Ghandi. Wouldn't you put a comma after "leader"? No, I don't use this, unless I'm pretending to talk from some other era.



  3. Jill likes rock, myself folk. No.



  4. That house in Barry St, is that where they live? Absolutely. This sounds like very natural speech.



  5. That letter wants to go first class. Wants to go? No.
<She was an outstanding leader was Mrs Ghandi. Wouldn't you put a comma after "leader"?>

I guess it would depend on whether there was a pause there or not.

<No, I don't use this, unless I'm pretending to talk from some other era.>

Is it from another era?

<Jill likes rock, myself folk. No.>

What would be your version in spoken English?
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  1. He won’t be late, I don’t think. yes, but only if I was being sarcastic and wanted to show that actually I think he will be late. Rather like 'I love cabbage - not!'



  2. She was an outstanding leader was Mrs Ghandi. very occasionally



  3. Jill likes rock, myself folk. no, I can't stand this misuse of myself.



  4. That house in Barry St, is that where they live? yes



  5. That letter wants to go first class. no, but I've heard it. I'd probably say 'needs' to go...

<Jill likes rock, myself folk. no, I can't stand this misuse of myself.>

Why is it a misuse?

<That letter wants to go first class. no, but I've heard it. I'd probably say 'needs' to go... >

Me too.
Milky<Jill likes rock, myself folk. no, I can't stand this misuse of myself.>

Why is it a misuse?

Me, myself, personally, I, think it is a misuse.

Actually I don't think it is too much of a misuse in speech, but in writing I find using using "myself" other than reflexively, or judiciously, for emphasis, irritating.

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<Actually I don't think it is too much of a misuse in speech, but in writing I find using using "myself" other than reflexively, or judiciously, for emphasis, irritating.>

And how about answering the topic question, Forbes?
I don't think I use 1, 2, 3, 5.

If I were a private investigator, and wanted to give an impression of great judiciousness, I might say:


"That house in Barry St..."

<pause to light cigarette, inhale with narrowed eyes, exhale slowly>

"...Is that where they live?"
As an ordinary non-judicious oik, however, no.

MrP

PS: "Gandhi", if e.g. Indira.
MrPedanticI don't think I use 1, 2, 3, 5.

If I were a private investigator, and wanted to give an impression of great judiciousness, I might say:


"That house in Barry St..."

<pause to light cigarette, inhale with narrowed eyes, exhale slowly>

"...Is that where they live?"
As an ordinary non-judicious oik, however, no.

MrP

PS: "Gandhi", if e.g. Indira.

What's all this "if I were" stuff? The differences in the way we natives really use English are a bit scary. Many times, they seem not reflect the answers we give to students here.
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