+0
I've heard it used in both active and passive voices that seem to show no difference or variation in meaning......or so it seems to me, for instance:

I am heading this way. (active)

I am headed this way. (passive)

Is there any differences between the 2 sentences. When does one use an active voice and not the other and vice versa? Thanks a lot.

Raen
+0
RaenI
I am heading this way. (active) >> present progressive - means going to a place in a particular direction. ("this way")

I am headed this way. (passive)>> This is not passive voice. It is active voice. It has about the same meaning as the previous statement, but it is not the progressive form. This use of "head" is an intransitive verb. It has no object, and thus passive forms are not possible.
There is a different meaning for head, "to be in charge of". This is a transitive verb and can have passive forms. I head this department. (I am in charge). The department is headed by Mr. Smith (passive form).

Is there any differences between the 2 sentences. When does one use an active voice and not the other and vice versa? Thanks a lot.

Raen

Comments  
To my knowledge there is NO difference between them!

We use both, and they both mean I'm travelling in this direction.

They are what we call colloquialisms. Used in a friendly, casual way!

Good luck.

msg me, or skype me sometime, if I can be of any more help.

Cheers,
Nick
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks for your help Nick, and also Star:
AlpheccaStars
I am heading this way. (active) >> present progressive - means going to a place in a particular direction. ("this way")

I am headed this way. (passive)>> This is not passive voice. It is active voice. It has about the same meaning as the previous statement, but it is not the progressive form. This use of "head" is an intransitive verb. It has no object, and thus passive forms are not possible

I may not have a clear idea of what "active" and "passive" voices are, not long ago I was corrected for mis-identifying a set of sentences as such. Still if, in this case, "head" is an intransitive verb, why does it take form of "be + past participal" (...am headed..) that's also the form of passive voice (as far as I know). So what part of speech is it?
I am determined to succeed. He was relaxed in his easy chair.

Determined and relaxed are a past participles. They are used as adjectives to describe the subjects (I / He)

Past participles are frequently used as (predicate) adjectives. They are very often used with the verb "be", such as:
I am happy.
Regular adjective:
He had a determined look on his face.
Here are some active / passive pairs with transitive verbs:

The bad news stunned me. (active)

I was stunned by the bad news. (passive)
The sound of the shots startled the deer. (active)
The deer was startled by the sound of the shots. (passive)

The startled deer ran away. (startled is an adjective).
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thanks Star, now I've got it.

So "headed" is a past participle used as adjective, or more specifically predicate adjective. Thanks a lot.

Raen