+0
Hello,

I have to use "head-on" adjective in the senetnce given below.

1. The two cars were involved in a direct collision.

The answer should start i.e

a) The two cars ___________________.

My approach to this is

b) The two cars were head-on collided.

c) The two car were collided head-on.

Which one is correct (b) or (c) or none?
Comments  
Hi,

Neither is correct. Just say The two cars collided head-on.

Use active voice, you don't need passive here, OK?

Best wishes, Clive
Hello Clive,

Neither is correct. Just say The two cars collided head-on.

Here in this senetce "head-on" is and adjective or an adverb? I could not understand. I was asked to use the "head-on" as an adjective in the given sentence.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi,

You could also say The two cars were involved in a head-on collision.

Clive
Hello,

1. The two cars collided head-on.

"head-on" here is an adjective or an adverb?
The two cars had a head-on collision.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi,

The two cars collided head-on.

"head-on" here is an adjective or an adverb?

It's an adverb here, but in 'a head-on collision', it's an adjective.

Best wishes, Clive
Yes, that is correct i think