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Hi,

I have a question with regards to mixed verb "hear" -

1. She hears the music.

2. She is hearing the music.

3. She is hearing voices.

I was told that the first sentence is correct but the second one is incorrect. Can anyone please tell me what is the difference in the usage (apart from one sentence being in simple present,other being in present continous)? Why is the second sentence incorrect (if it is incorrect) ?What is the difference in the third sentence then?

Thanks
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Hear is one of those verbs of sensation which do not normally appear in progressive aspect:

I smell something burning.
I see you behind that tree.
I feel a rock in my shoe.


These are verbs of simple, unwilled perception. Compare She hears the music now (she is able to perceive the sounds) with She is listening to the music now (a willed act of perception/appreciation).

There is a slight difference with your 3rd sentences in that it is idiomatic-- to hear voices = to have audio hallucinations.
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MaverickK have a question with regards to mixed verb "hear" -
with regard to
Thanks for your reply. I have one more question.

1. She looks tired.

2. She is lookin tired.

3. Harry misses Sally.

4. Harry is missing Sally.

"look" and "miss" are not words of sensation. Then why is the 1st and 3rd sentence correct, while the 2nd and 4th sentences are incorrect?

What is the difference in meaning between 1st and 2nd sentence?

Thanks
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Verbs of sensation are only a subgroup of verbs that usually avoid the progressive.
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Do you agree that the 2nd and 4th sentences are incorrect? If so, why are they incorrect?

What is the difference in meaning between 1st-2nd and 3rd-4th? Please explain.

Thanks
MaverickK
I think you don't understand what Mister Micawber said.

The first and third sentences are correct.

1. She looks tired.

2. She is looking tired.

3. Harry misses Sally.

4. Harry is missing Sally.

It is not correct to say 'He is looking sad.' You have to say 'He looks sad.'

Similarly, 'The child lookis sad. She misses her pet, which has been stolen.'

I understood what Mister Micawber said. But I had additional queries. If it is not correct to say -

"He is looking sad" , then look at the following sentences -

1. He is looking at the flowers.

2. He looks at the flowers.

3. He misses Sally.

4. He is missing his favourite TV program.

How come all the 4 sentences above are correct?
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Do you agree that the 2nd and 4th sentences are incorrect? If so, why are they incorrect?
What is the difference in meaning between 1st-2nd and 3rd-4th? Please explain.
I did not say they were incorrect; I said that the usual form is the simple aspect. This applies to a number of [url=http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/stat.htm ]STATIVE VERBS[/url], including verbs of sensation. Please take a look at that page and also search English Forums for the phrase 'stative verbs', many threads of which repeat your questions.


A. He is looking sad

1. He is looking at the flowers.

2. He looks at the flowers.

3. He misses Sally.

4. He is missing his favourite TV program.
These are all OK because the two verbs each have two forms, a stative (#A and 3) and a dynamic (#1,2 and 4) form, with different meanings.

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