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Hey guys,

Can you please help me out with this one: "to be heavy on the wire" What in the world does this mean ???
Your help will be much appreciated!
Comments  
It's not a common idiom. Can you give us some context?
I don't think this is an English idiom.

It's used mainly in German forums, and I've found an explanation from someone:

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Perhaps it was something like an impossible translation of
the German "schwer auf Draht sein" into "to be heavy on the wire".

It should mean, to be top concentrated, highly ambitioned and best
prepared.
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Perhaps: intense, focussed.

OK, I've found another site:

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schwer auf Draht sein to be heavy on wire meaning: to react very fast

http://www.wolf-zone.de/projects/german/language.html
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You are on fire man! Thanks a lot!
Marius HancuI don't think this is an English idiom.

It's used mainly in German forums, and I've found an explanation from someone:

-------
Perhaps it was something like an impossible translation of
the German "schwer auf Draht sein" into "to be heavy on the wire".

It should mean, to be top concentrated, highly ambitioned and best
prepared.
-------

Perhaps: intense, focussed.

OK, I've found another site:

-------
schwer auf Draht sein to be heavy on wire meaning: to react very fast

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It means to be cool.

Fronzi is very heavy on the wire. When ever he snaps his fingers women appear.
As mentioned, it is a German expression which means somebody really "knows their stuff" or is very "ambitious". It's not particularly easy to translate, but I think you understand now. Emotion: smile

Andrew
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No, it doesn't mean that at all. It means 'to be slow on the uptake'. It was invented as a way of taking the *** out of a former German president who didn't speak any English at all and once translated a German phrase word for word when speaking to the Queen of England on a state visit to Germany in May 1966. They were at a race meeting and he wanted to tell her that the race was about to start. In German that would be 'gleich geht es los'. What he said was 'equal (gleich) goes (geht) it (es) loose (los)'