I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" in a positive sense, to mean exciting and enjoyable. My shock was met with the explanation that it is a very common usage in South Africa. Does this match with the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

Redwine
Hamburg
(previously: Berlin, Northants, Derbs, Staffs, NSW, Tasmania, Melbourne, rural Victoria, in that and many other orders)
 2 3 4 5 6 7 » 47
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" in a positive sense, to mean exciting and enjoyable. My ... common usage in South Africa. Does this match with the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

Many people complain about their hectic schedule but deep down they're very proud that they're not given to routine
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" in a positive sense, to mean exciting and enjoyable. My ... very common usage in South Africa. Does this match with the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

I occasionally use it in that sense to describe how my life has been for the past four years: hectic busy, enjoyable, and quite exciting. I think, furthermore, that only nerds, here, use it in that very sense.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
`Still using Mandrake Linux 9.0, though.'
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" in a positive sense, to mean exciting and enjoyable. My ... very common usage in South Africa. Does this match with the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

If you like that kind of thing.
Hectic means feverish, overheated, or overclocked or fast-paced.

A hectic party would be a frenzied one, and some enjoy such things. Most people I know don't call it a "hectic party", however, but a "rave".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" in a positive sense, to mean exciting and enjoyable. My shock was met with the explanation that it is a very common usage in South Africa.

Nothing good has ever come out of South Africa, my easily-shocked friend.

Charles Riggs
- Primarily northeast US upbringing
- Currently living on the west coast of Ireland; passingly familiar with Hibernian-English expressions
- No discernable Irish accent
My email address: chriggs/at/eircom/dot/net
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" ... with the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outsideSAfrE?

If you like that kind of thing. Hectic means feverish, overheated, or overclocked or fast-paced. A hectic party would be a frenzied one, and some enjoy such things. Most people I know don't call it a "hectic party", however, but a "rave".

"Hectic" seems to be common usage in the sense of exciting and enjoyable amongst the very young in South Africa. I think it might be specific to Johannesburg as I didn't hear it in Kimberley or Port Elizabeth or Cape Town when I lived there. However, what with a flat mate who's dating a university student I probably get subjected to more of the youth than I did before.
If I'm going to put in my own stage directions here they'll read as follows:
Moira, the Faerie Godmother
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi,
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" ... the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

As I was reading this thread, I overhead a colleague tell another "jis, it's hectic hey?" . It's used all the time here in South Africa, especially amongst the youngsters - and is slang nowadays for anything from "it is excellent!" to "it's too much for me!". You read into the meaning depending on the context in which it is used.

Which has just brought me to another point - I believe in the African Zulu language, there is only one word to describe both the colour "blue" and the colour "green" and no word for "computer".

Regards,
b
I recently (fifteen minutes ago) encountered the use of "hectic" ... the experience of aue-ers and aeu-ers? What about outside SAfrE?

If you like that kind of thing. Hectic means feverish, overheated, or overclocked or fast-paced. A hectic party would be a frenzied one, and some enjoy such things. Most people I know don't call it a "hectic party", however, but a "rave".

I get the impression that a "rave" here is a party where drugs are used. I'm too far out of the drug loop to know that for sure, or what type of drugs are used. The police are constantly cracking-down on raves, so there must be something illicit about them.
I get the impression that a "rave" here is a party where drugs are used. I'm too far out of ... type of drugs are used. The police are constantly cracking-down on raves, so there must be something illicit about them.

No, from what I gather a rave is about the dancing. But I've certainly never been to one. My flat mate does them, and he doesn't do drugs.

Moira, the Faerie Godmother
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more