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Which of the following is NOT an example of a transitive inseparable (Type 3) phrasal verb?
  1. He came up with an interesting idea.
  2. I filled up my gas tank this morning.
  3. I don’t know if I can put up with my husband any longer.
  4. She got off the bus at the wrong stop.
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First, what is your guess? Can you write the "separated" sentences? Having done that, do you have a feel for which one works?

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Voytaszek Which of the following is NOT an example of a transitive inseparable (Type 3) phrasal verb?
  1. He came up with an interesting idea.
  2. I filled up my gas tank this morning.
  3. I don’t know if I can put up with my husband any longer.
  4. She got off the bus at the wrong stop.

I come across the term 'phrasal verb' quite often, but it is misleading and its analysis can be tricky and often flawed. Many of the so-called 'phrasal verbs' are best 'verbal idioms', or sometime prepositional verbs.

If you are a student, you must use the terminology you are being taught, but just bear in mind that strictly speaking it is not the whole expressions came up with, filled up etc., that are verbs, but just the words came, filled etc. The other words are prepositions.

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The 4th?

 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.
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BillJNone of the verbs are transitive for the noun phrases following the prepositions are not objects of the verbs. It is not the whole expressions "came up with", "filled up" etc., that are verbs, but just the words "came", "filled" etc.

But it is common to consider the phrasal verb as a whole as transitive. Also, I wouldn't call "up" in "fill up" a preposition.

Voytaszek

The 4th?

Does "She got the bus off at the wrong stop" look correct to you?

GPY
BillJNone of the verbs are transitive for the noun phrases following the prepositions are not objects of the verbs. It is not the whole expressions "came up with", "filled up" etc., that are verbs, but just the words "came", "filled" etc.

But it is common to consider the phrasal verb as a whole as transitive. Also, I wouldn't call "up" in "fill up" a preposition.

I would call it an intransitive preposition, though many would call it an adverb.

Filled up my gas tank consists of verb + preposition + NP object. (the prep is a 'particle'.)

The important thing is that filled up is not a constituent at word level: it’s a verb phrase. Verb is a word category, like noun, adjective etc., and it's filled that is a verb: this is the word that takes the verbal inflections. So we have:

I filled up my gas tank

but not

*I fill upped my gas tank.

That's why the term 'phrasal verb' is thoroughly misleading.

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BillJI would - what else could it be?

Particle or adverbial particle is a common term, I think (see e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb#Examples ).

BillJThat's why the term 'phrasal verb' is thoroughly misleading.

OK, personally I think it is a useful concept for learners.

GPYParticle or adverbial particle is a common term, I think (see e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb#Examples

Particle is not a part of speech or function, but a term that is applied to those short words (mostly intransitive prepositions) that can occur between the verb and its direct object, for example:

She took the suitcase down ~ She took down the suitcase.

Here, down is a particle, more specifically a preposition functioning as a complement.

GPYOK, personally I think it is a useful concept for learners.

I think the kind of expressions that the OP cited are much better called 'verbal idioms' (or 'prepositional verbs' for a couple of them) since that's what they really are, and it avoids the endless confusion about how to parse them. Btw, I see the OP is still unable to fathom out which of their four examples is a 'type 3' phrasal verb!

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