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Hello!
I'm from Germany and a former student who joined school again. Today, English homework was given to us, but I'm not really sure whether the sentences I wrote are right or not. Maybe somebody could check them and give me a feedback?!
Thanks in advance!!!

Homework-->
1. How did Christopher amass such an enormous amount of debts?
A: His financial issue began when he didn't tell the truth about his personal facts on applying for a credit from a financial institution. After he got that credit, he started to spent that plastic money wastefully into a vast amount of needless things. Much to his regret he fell quickly into a hole of debts and wasn't able to climb out of that cave on his own.

2. Who helped him to stop making more debts?
A: Christopher's mother helped him out to stop making more debts. She destroyed his credit cards in order to avoid that her son gets into more trouble.

3. What is Christopher's current employment?
A: Christopher currently works as a steward on a cross-channel ferry.
I wouldn't like to work as a steward like Christopher, but if I were in his position with his credit issue I would probably do the job, just to pay off those debts.

4. Why is it difficult for Christopher to pay back his debts?
A: In his occupation he earns only about 150 pounds a week and on the contrary there is the debt which exceeds his weekly income to a considerable degree. Without the help of his parents he wouldn't be able to bear the resulting amount.

5. What, according to Christopher's mother, will be the negative consequences if teenagers borrow such high sums of money?
A: Christopher's mother is afraid that those credit companies will soon create a generation of people who aren't able to mange their liquid assets and become independent from their parents.

6. Why has it become so easy for teenagers to get a credit card?
A: The competition on the credit market has risen rapidly. The only problem is that new companies haven't all the necessary security precautions needed to prevent that sophisticated youngsters can obtain a credit.

7. According to the Credit Card Research Group, what is the main reason why young people get into debt so easily?
A: The main reason stated by the Credit Card Research Group for this matter, is that most of young people aren't capable to deal with money. A shortcoming in a proper handling with funds seems like the difficulty of their typical behaviour.

8. When seeking help from organisations like the Credit Card Research Group, what are the chances and dangers?
A: The dangers of seeking help from an organisation like the Credit Card Research Group are that young people could get into serious trouble because of their dishonesty on completion of the contract. Due to their criminal offence there is a risk of a prosecution. On the other hand they have a chance to become afloat, because they weren't old enough to sign a valid contract at that moment.
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1. How did Christopher amass such an enormous amount number of debts? OR "amount of debt" (countable/ uncountable)

A: His financial issue began when he didn't tell the truth about his personal facts on applying for (a) credit from a financial institution. (Again, countable vs. uncountable. In the US, we would not use the "a.") After he got that credit, he started to spent that plastic money wastefully into on a vast amount number of needless things. (I guess "amount of things" is sometimes used, but considered lower register.) Much to his regret he fell quickly into a hole of debts and wasn't able to climb out of that cave on his own. (Possibly a mixed metaphor. I consider a cave as the sort of hole one enters horizontally - not one which one falls into. But I guess it's possible.)

2. Who helped him to stop making more debts? incurring more debt?

A: Christopher's mother helped him out to stop (making more debts). She destroyed his credit cards in order to avoid prevent that her son gets from getting into more trouble.

3. What is Christopher's current employment?
A: Christopher currently works as a steward on a cross-channel ferry.
I wouldn't like to work as a steward like Christopher, but if I were in his position with his credit issue I would probably do the job, just to pay off those debts.

4. Why is it difficult for Christopher to pay back his debts?
A: In his occupation he earns only about 150 pounds a week . and on the contrary there is the His debt which exceeds his weekly income to a considerable degree. Without the help of his parents he wouldn't be able to bear the resulting amount.

5. What, according to Christopher's mother, will be the negative consequences if of teenagers borrow borrowing such high large sums of money? ("High sums" is an uncommon collocation.)

A: Christopher's mother is afraid that those credit companies will soon create a generation of people who aren't able to mange their liquid assets and become independent from their parents.

6. Why has it become so easy for teenagers a teenager to get a credit card?
A: The competition on in the credit market has risen rapidly. The only problem is that new companies haven't installed (all) the necessary security precautions needed to prevent that sophisticated youngsters can obtain from obtaining (a) credit.

7. According to the Credit Card Research Group, what is the main reason why young people get into debt so easily?
A: The main reason stated by the Credit Card Research Group for this matter (phenomenon?) (,) is that most of young people aren't capable to deal of dealing with money. A shortcoming in a proper handling with funds seems like the difficulty of their typical behaviour. This last sentence is too horrible. You don't really need it at all.

8. When seeking help from organisations like the Credit Card Research Group, what are the chances and dangers? (This seems ambiguous. Do you mean "benefits"? "advanatages"?)

A: The dangers danger of in seeking help from an organisation like the Credit Card Research Group are is that on completion of the contract, young people could get into serious trouble because of their dishonesty. on completion of the contract. Due to their criminal offence there is a risk of a prosecution.
On the other hand , they have a chance to become remain afloat, because they weren't old enough to sign a valid contract at that moment.

The English is quite good!

I see a logical problem with #8, because there's nothing in the above which suggests criminal behavior. Your answer suggests that all the people who use this service are guilty of breaking the law.
But what law? In the US, failure to pay one's bills is not a criminal act. If the person is sued, and fails to comply with a court order, then it's a criminal act.
Do they still have "debtor's prisons" somewhere?
If there's prior context describing criminal activity, you should refer to it in your answer to question eight.

I don't hear "making more debts" in the US. Maybe it's used elsewhere.

Emotion: smile - A.

Edit.

His financial issue began when he didn't tell the truth about his personal facts on applying for a credit from a financial institution.

Sorry. I didn't pick up on this, because it didn't seem to answer the question (#1)
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Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thanks a lot for your help!!!Emotion: smile
You're welcome.

I meant to add to my "edit," but had to rush off.

I only know a little about US rules and regulations, but I've never heard of lying on an application (credit, employment, etc.) being considered a criminal act.

It may be grounds for cancellation of the credit contract, or the employment agreement.

In order for someone to be accused of a criminal act, there must have been a law passed specifically against it.

The great Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens is or was being considered for a criminal charge, not for taking steroids, but for lying to Congress about it. (There's definitely a law against that!)

I think that might have been Bill Clinton's problem too. Emotion: sad