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Nasti J filted:
adverb + adjective

sick and tired Bill Cosby: And tired always followed sick. Worst beating I ever got in my life, my mother said, "Well I am just sick," and I said "And tired." I don't remember anything after that.

They're the opposites, contrarespectively, of "hale" and "hearty"..r

What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
Nasti J filted:

sick and tired Bill Cosby: And tired always followed sick. ... I said "And tired." I don't remember anything after that.

They're the opposites, contrarespectively, of "hale" and "hearty"..r

True, but the colloquial phrase actually means something like "disgusted" or "fed up".
"I'm sick and tired of your leaving the toilet seat up."

Aspasia
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(What, apart from that, does it mean?)
Just a few quickies:
properly so called
set phrase (!)
stock epithet
prime object, primary object, principal object
hard and fast

Mike.
I was able to read it but I got as far as 'There are many things you can do with a trumpet' and fell about laughing and that was pretty much it for my concentration. I shall try to remember to look at things in the office with a more sober eye tomorrow and see if anything jumps out.
Oh, dear, there it goes again..
Stephanie
in Brussels
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on studies skills for Doctoral students I've been commissioned to develop. ... looking especially at collocations with adjectives and adverbs). This is what I've got so far: adverb + adjective abundantly clear...

"This whole subject" "is part and parcel of" something "your average" writer should "leave severely alone".

Jerry Friedman
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skills for how a skills, and of adjectives The draft defines the topic

Is that a cliche?
as

Is that a cliche?
1. This 4600-word draft is about what editors call cliches: but uses this term nowhere, and appears to rely for source material

Is that a cliche?
on a bibliography of 28-odd items in technical linguistics. No work on good writing style

Is that a cliche?
is cited. 2. This draft defines as its subject matter

Is that a cliche?
English written by non-native English speakers, as distinct from

Is that a cliche?
English written by native speakers. So far as ... are concerned,

Is that a cliche?
this separation may be impractical. E.g. Henry Kissinger's mother tongue

Is that a cliche?
was German but he has since age 20 published millions of words in English. Professionals in his community have ... the objective is a typology of errors in English or a typology of correct English with defective or deplorable style.

Well, that's because it's not about either thing.
The paper is not about overuse of hackneyed expressions - cliches. It's about collocations - multi-word combinations such as the ones you're using above, and which native speakers use every day - 'mother tongue' is a good example, as is 'abundantly clear'. These combinations are neither defective or deplorable, they just exist.
Though Howarth doesn't use the term, it's also about 'chunking'; the way we learn language in multi-word elements and learn which words go together. So blonde might mean 'pale browny-yellow', but even if you had a pale browny-yellow car, you wouldn't say 'I've got a blonde car'; we learn that blonde is an adjective that only goes with hair, by extension with people with blond/e hair (usually women), and, at a push, some continental lagers. If you're looking for a place to stay for the night you may want somewhere to sleep and a meal the next morning, but you're going to get strange looks and not get very far if you ask for *'breakfast and bed' instead of 'bed and breakfast'.

'Pawley and Syder' s widely quoted study of lexicalization of word combinations comes to a similar conclusion: "Memorized sentences and phrases are the normal building blocks of fluent spoken discourse .. The attempt to find a novel turn of phrase to describe the familiar is ... likely to produce dysfluencies: it is easier to be commonplace." (1983: 208)' (But note they aren't saying that 'the attempt to find a novel turn of phrase' is a bad thing in all circumstances - see what Howarth says later about newspaper leader writiers)

Lack of knowledge of collocation is one of the things that makes non-native speakers - and writers - sound non-native. Here's Howarth again:

"a speaker who does not command this array (100s of 1000s of memorised sentence stems) does not know the language." (1985:69) If phraseological competence is essential for native speakerness, what does this mean for language learners? Do they have it? and if not, do they need it? and if so, how do they get it?"

I've spent much of the last 25 years wondering what the answer to that last question is. What a bloody waste(1); I could have been a brain surgeon(2).

Anyway. One of the early things we teach is collocation with 'make' and 'do' - 'do the shopping', 'make the beds' 'do the washing up'. Is 'make the bed' a cliche? Or shall we all start doing the beds, instead?

Cheers
DC
(1) That's one.
(2)So's that.
Then a moment ago I posted a reply with the ... academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

Reaching for the topmost paper on my "To read" pile I find: highly relevant wide diversity active market seminal study closely monitored empirical inquiry national culture statistical link risk management (noun+noun?)

Thank's, Laura, those are the sort of academic examples I was looking for. I'm going to come some random papers to find more examples in the wild. DC
"a speaker who does not command this array (100s of 1000s of memorised sentence stems) does not know the language." ... beds' 'do the washing up'. Is 'make the bed' a cliche? Or shall we all start doing the beds, instead?

Thanks for that very interesting clarification. From my own experience of learning foreign languages, I'd say that learning set phrases and trotting them out in appropriate situations is a good way of making native speakers believe your competence in their language is greater than it really is. The only problem is, you can then find yourself in deeper linguistic waters than you'd bargained for, when your interlocutor stops making allowances for your learner status and launches into high speed fully idiomatic mode but that bracing experience does motivate further learning.
A German-speaking friend commented once on an interview given by the then British Ambassador on German TV: "He's impressively fluent, until you realise all he's doing is repeating cliches". I thought she was rather underestimating his ability, but I got her point. (There's another one for you).
I remember once hailing a taxi in Paris, and being treated after a brief exchange of courtesies to a long diatribe about the iniquitous taxi-driver strike that was just about to start. I only understood about a half of it, but made appropriate interjections from time to time, such "alors!" "vraiment?" "***!" and so on. Paying him after 25 minutes of this, he said "Vous parlez tres bien Francais Monsieur".
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Anyway. One of the early things we teach is collocation ... cliche? Or shall we all start doing the beds, instead?

Thanks for that very interesting clarification. From my own experience of learning foreign languages, I'd say that learning set phrases ... your learner status and launches into high speed fully idiomatic mode but that bracing experience does motivate further learning.

I've had exactly the same experience, especially in Greek, where I've got an impressive range of restaurant phrases - 'can we see the kitchen?', 'what's good tonight' and so forth. Like you say Fred, this sometimes makes native speakers overestimate your competence in their language...

DC
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