This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on studies skills for Doctoral students I've been commissioned to develop. I'm writing about how a knowledge of collocations is essential to develop academic writing skills, and I'm putting together a table of examples. (Collocations are words which commonly hang out with each other in phrases which form accepted blocks of meaning. In this context I'm looking especially at collocations with adjectives and adverbs).
This is what I've got so far:
adverb + adjective
abundantly clear
adjective + noun
colossal explosion
substantial reduction
pleasant environment
admirable gesture
sound investment
fantastic opportunity
high quality
unmitigated disaster
heavy rain
deep sleep
strong denial
noun + adjective
proof positive
verb + adverb
rain heavily
sleep deeply
deny strongly
adverb + verb
richly deserve
Then a moment ago I posted a reply with the words, 'I stand corrected', which is verb+adjective and reminiscent of the recent and regular 'why is it "he looks sad" and not "he looks sadly"?' thread, but please lets not go there. (1)

Anyway, I'd be very grateful if I could sample auers', aeurs' and melees' suggestions for further inclusion in the four lists. The things I've got so far are OK, but none of them sound as though they might have come from a piece of academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

If anyone is interested, there's a rock paper about this stuff here:
DC (1) Please.
1 2 3 4
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on studies skills for Doctoral students I've been commissioned to develop. ... pleasant environment admirable gesture sound investmentsound reasoning fantastic opportunity high quality unmitigated disaster heavy rain deep sleep strong denialheady days

drab vocabulary
stuffed shirt
noun + adjective proof positive verb + adverb rain heavily sleep deeply deny strongly adverb + verb richly deservefoolishly consider ... of example I'm after. If anyone is interested, there's a rock paper about this stuff here: DC (1) Please.

The trouble with the world is that the
stupid are cocksure and the intelligent
are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on ... interested, there's a rock paper about this stuff here: http://tinyurl.com/6zgfrz

The draft defines the topic as
This paper aims to show the relevance of phraseology to an understandingof non-native speaker Academic Writing, an approach that needs ... >loose, and, on the other hand, the much more disparate categories of expressions, such as >proverbs, catchphrases and conversational formulae

Problems appear to include:

1. This 4600-word draft is about what editors call cliches:but uses this term nowhere, and appears to rely for source material on a bibliography of 28-odd items in technical linguistics. No work on good writing style is cited.
2. This draft defines as its subject matter English written bynon-native English speakers, as distinct from English written by native speakers. So far as written sources are concerned, this separation may be impractical. E.g. Henry Kissinger's mother tongue was German but he has since age 20 published millions of words in English. Professionals in his community have no disciplinary way of dividing source texts between those by authors for whom English is a first or a second language.
3. The source idea ("phraseology" instead of cliche) is documentedto two Moscow publications of 1968. It is not clear whether the objective is a typology of errors in English or a typology of correct English with defective or deplorable style. Both are discussed as if similar but we have no reason to suppose them similar.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on studies skills for Doctoral students I've been commissioned to develop. ... as though they might have come from a piece of academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

acid test
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on ... context I'm looking especially at collocations with adjectives and adverbs).

Anyway, I'd be very grateful if I could sample auers', ... academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

acid test

foregone conclusion
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on studies skills for Doctoral students I've been commissioned to develop. ... as though they might have come from a piece of academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

Reaching for the topmost paper on my "To read" pile I find:

highly relevant
wide diversity
active market
seminal study
closely monitored
empirical inquiry
national culture
statistical link
risk management (noun+noun?)
If anyone is interested, there's a rock paper about this stuff here:

Word 2007 won't let me read this. "Rock paper" somehow implies the existence of scissors...

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
This fine morning I'm working on the e-learning project on ... academic writing, and that's the sort of example I'm after.

acid testIs that a litmus test?

I was going to add: foregone conclusion
T.
acid test

Is that a litmus test?

See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/acid%20test , where it will tell you that an acid test is a severe or crucial test, and that the term was first attested in 1912.

But the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary says that while an "acid-test" is figuratively a crucial test, it's also a test for gold that involves nitric acid.
adverb + adjective

sick and tired
Bill Cosby: And tired always followed sick. Worst beating I ever got in my life, my mother said, "Well I am just sick," and I said "And tired." I don't remember anything after that.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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