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Hi friends,

This sentence,

----
Do you know how I can receive a notification e-mail when the topic I am interested got a reply?
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I am wondering about the 'got'. If I should use 'got' or 'has got'.

Thank you very much

\@/
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Comments  
Chaitatp,

"....when the topic I am interested in got a reply?"
or
"....when the topic I am interested in received a reply?"

Either one can be used. Also, please note the insertion of "in".
Hope that helps.

thanks thanks Emotion: big smile
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I would highly recommend the present tense, Chaitatp:

'Do you know how I can receive a notification e-mail when the topic I am interested in gets/receives a reply?'
Thank you... Emotion: big smile
I wonder if I can say it in this form MrM, (my not well-trained eyes don't find the 'bridge' between notificacion and e-mail):
'Do you know how I can receive a notification via e-mail when the topic I am interested in gets/receives a reply?'
or
'Do you know how I can receive an e-mail notification e-mail when the topic I am interested in gets/receives a reply?'
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well,i think it would be better if u say :

...when the topic im interested in gets replies

but im not sure:)

Replies
is fine too, Tas-y1n.

Notification in my form of the sentence, Latin, is an adjective modifying email: notification email, deletion email, etc. Your first sentence is also fine (notification via e-mail)-- it just uses a different structure to say the same thing. In your second sentence, however, the phrase an e-mail notification e-mail is redundant-- you certainly don't need 2 emails.

(PS: Yes, it's me-- forgot to sign in again. It's becoming a bad habit!-- MM)
Ups, I'm sorry it was an extra ctrl+c, I intended to say just: an e-mail notification, is this OK?
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