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Hallo!

I'm from Belgium and I study German Languages (German & English). And soon...the exams. For English, we had to prepare a "file" with 15 pages of press articles. I've choosen, among others, one about Stanley Kubrick and there're some idioms/words and phrases that I don't understand...

Could you help?

Here they are:

www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7506399/site/newsweek/ (the article)

* What I don't understand: In the second paragraph: "this latest literary WET-KISS to Kubrick is a very heavy book" => Wet-kiss?

* In the 4th. paragraph, "You could use it for a bookmark IF the book didn't already have one of those cloth bookmarks sewn into its spine" => why "if" here? How do you explain? Is it the same here as "although?"

* In the 7th paragraph: "Later Kubrick MOVIES-FROM "2001" ON-MOVIE in GREAT BIG CHUNKS", I don't understand the sense of this phrase.

I hope you can help!Emotion: embarrassed

'mira!
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Comments  
Welcome mira,
this latest literary WET-KISS to Kubrick is a very heavy book


I think this means that the book is sycophantic, i.e. fawning or obsequious.
You could use it for a bookmark IF the book didn't already have one of those cloth bookmarks sewn into its spine


"If" is used here together with the conditional "could" because the author is speaking of an imaginary situation.

"If it didn't have a bookmark, then you would be able to use the CD as a bookmark"
"Later Kubrick MOVIES-FROM "2001" ON-MOVIE in GREAT BIG CHUNKS


The first problem with this sentence is that there should be a space before and after the hyphen

"Later Kubrick movies - from "2001" on - move in great big chunks"

I think the author is saying that the films are comprised not so much of a smooth narrative, as of big sections of specific action, which are then rapidly followed by another big section of action. His allegory of the box cars trudling up one after the other is very picturesque.
Thank you very much!! I will need further help later, I continue to work on my articles and I'll ask...

see you Very soon Emotion: wink
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Look forward to hearing from you mira. Good luck[Y]
Me again...

Well... Still Kubrick :

- 8th Paragraph: "there is the SCENERY-CHEWING of a Jack Nicholson"... what's a scenery-chewing?

- 8th Paragraph (end) :" We are always observing these people, never identifying with any of them, yet when the one-legged Barry, as battered by life as a man can be, emerges from that coach at the end of the movie, it is all but impossible not to sigh and say, “There but for the grace of God go all of us.” " What does "There but for the grace of God go all of us.” mean in this context?

That's all for the moment!

ThanksEmotion: embarrassed
Hi,
Someone who 'chews the scenery' is over-acting, acting in a very exaggerated way.

'There but for the grace of God go all of us'.

We can say this when someone has a problem. It means:
This is a problem that any of us might have, except that God, by Her grace and mercy, has not given it to us. We are lucky.

If someone does something stupid and falls out of a window, we wouldn't say this.
If someone develops a terrible disease, we might easily say this.

Best wishes,
Clive
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,17329-1288087,00.html

And...Me again..

In the paragraph " Exams are goalposts, not the game" : "A DEGREE OF ASSESSMENT NERVES are natural and useful in keeping you alert"... What does the begininng of the phrase mean?

Thanks Emotion: big smile
Hi,
"A DEGREE OF ASSESSMENT NERVES are natural and useful in keeping you alert"

'Some level or amount of nervousness about being assessed is natural and useful in keeping you alert'

Best wishes,
Clive
Thanks!!!

What does "It's all about keeping it together" mean?

Emotion: smile
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