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Dear TeacherEmotion: smile

Some questions from below conversation.

1. A: Oh, I forgot! Tom’s waiting for us at the Mall!

2. B: He might be angry.

3. A: Don’t worry! He’s always late!

4. B: No. he might be angry because I told you my big news first!

I n those 4 sentence, from context I do understand what they are talking about.But just want to learn more.



Q1: If sentence 4 No. he might be…” If the word “No” in red ink means, person B doesn’t agree with person A said Don’t worry!” because maybe she does a bit worry.

Tell me if I got the real meanings the person B said.

Q2: If sentence 4 > Can it be changed to Yes. But he might be angry because I told you my big news first! If this change is ok, what does it mean the “ Yes.”

Q3: If sentence 4 > Can it be changed to No, I don’t. Or Yes! I do.

Q4: If sentence 4 > Can it be changed to No, I do. Or Yes! I don’t.

Q5: about punctuation,and . , if No, I don’t.” can be written intoNo. I don’t.”

Q6: continue Q5, if there will be make different meanings.

Thanks so much ahead of time. Jacky Lin. February 20th 2011.
Comments  
A: Oh, I forgot! Tom’s waiting for us at the Mall!
B: He might be angry.
A: Don’t worry! He’s always late! *
B: No. ** He might be angry because I told you my big news first!

* Right here, A thinks that B means this:

He might be angry because we will be late to arrive at the mall.

But A is wrong.
__________

** Here, B tells A that A is wrong.

No. = It's not because we will be late that Tom might be angry.

And then B goes on to tell the real reason why he thinks that Tom might be angry.

__________

I don't see how "No" can be changed to "Yes" in Sentence 4. You can change it to "No. You misunderstood me." or "No. That's not the reason." You cannot change it to any of those others.
______

"No, I don't" can be written as "No. I don't." Yes. That's OK.

CJ
Dear CalifJim

I understand 95% what you explained, I am not sure I can really 100% got it.

The following is another article in blue, similar to the usage of the "No."
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Jacky56LinWhen you forgive someone, you are not saying “It’s OK that you hurt me.” No.
The "No" just emphasizes what has already been said. It would be very tedious and cumbersome to say it like this:

When you forgive someone, you are not saying “It’s OK that you hurt me.” No, when you forgive someone, you are not saying “It’s OK that you hurt me.”

It amounts to saying the same thing twice: You are not .... You are not ....
Jacky56LinIs it acceptable, when change it into “B: Wrong. He might be angry because I told you my big news first.”
It is acceptable in terms of grammar and meaning. However, it is somewhat rude to tell someone they are wrong, so the word "No" can be used to soften what you say to someone else. By saying "No" instead of "Wrong" you won't seem so rude.

CJ
Dear CalifJim

I believe I understood it thoroughly about Q7 and Q8.

As you explained for Q7. I try to make a sentence. I want really to 100% got what you meant,

You won’t leave your work to me, no. I have no time to do either.

= You won’t leave your work to me, you won’t leave your work to me, I have no time to do either.

Am I right? I’ve made the similar meanings of the sentence, which is much like what you taught to me about the “no.”



Thank you again for teaching me so much.
Jacky56LinAm I right?
Yes. When you add "No" to a negative statement, you are emphasizing the negative.

I'm not willing to do that, no. / I'm not willing to do that. No.
That's not what I mean, no. / That's not what I mean. No.
Ken did not say he would come to the party, no. / Ken did not say he would come to the party. No.

CJ
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Dear CJ

Tank you very much for the explanation of above question

two more question about ”No."

In English question sentence

Q9:

A: Do you like me?
B: No. I don't. ( I know I don't = I don't like you, but what does this" No." in blue mean in person B ‘s thought?)

Q10

A: Don’t you like me?

B: No. I don't. (I know I don't = I don't like you, but what does this" No." in red mean in person B‘s thought?)

Thank you again.
Emotion: big smile Dear CJ or Anyone nice help me wieth this?
Jacky56LinQ9:
A: Do you like me?
B: No. I don't. ( I know I don't = I don't like you, but what does this" No." in blue mean in person B ‘s thought?)
Q10
A: Don’t you like me?
B: No. I don't. (I know I don't = I don't like you, but what does this" No." in red mean in person B‘s thought?)
Hmmm. This is hard to answer, because you already know what "No" means in both cases. It means "I don't like you" when said after either question.
____________

Maybe you're referring to the difference between the two situations. In Q9 and in Q10 the same question is being asked. The essence of the question is the same either way. A is asking B to say "yes" or "no" like this:

A: Say "yes" or "no" -- "yes" if you like me; "no" if you don't like me.
___

The difference is that Q9 is neutral and Q10 is not. When you ask a question in the negative, like Q10, most often you expect a "Yes" as the answer. You ask it in the negative to encourage the listener to agree with you that "Yes" is the 'right' answer. In a way, you are challenging the listener to answer the way you want him to. So the questions (in the mind of the questioner) are more like this:

Q9: Do you like me? (No extra thoughts.)

Q10: Don't you like me? (Of course, you like me. If you don't, I can't imagine what I've done to make you dislike me.)

But the answers "Yes" and "No" still mean the same thing, no matter which way the question is phrased.

CJ
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