+0
I have one doubt,

One day my teacher asked me the following question :

What will you do, If you are prime minister?

But after I come across this forum, I found that we should use (would instead of will) when we are talking about unreal condition.

So, now I think the sentence :

"What will you do, if you are prime minister? is wrong and we should say

"What would you do, if you were prime minister?

Could you explain me the hidden meaning in the above two sentences?
Comments  
It is not unreal in the future. Your teacher has great hopes for you, and thinks you have a chance of becoming Prime Minister-- and if you are Prime Minister some day, what will you do?
Mister MicawberIt is not unreal in the future. Your teacher has great hopes for you, and thinks you have a chance of becoming Prime Minister-- and if you are Prime Minister some day, what will you do?

Ok, thanks.

If teacher ask me, If you are Prime Minster some day, What will you do?

How should I reply?

I will do good for people.

Or

I would do good for people.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Think of it this way:

If you were (today) Prime Minister, what would you do?

If I were Prime Minister, I would...

If you are (elected next year as) Prime Minster, what will you do?

If I am (elected as) Prime Minister, I will...

Listen to politicians' speeches: If you elect me as your president, I will bring prosperity throughtout the land.
Thank you very much.

I understood, will and would concept.

Really, I like this website very much.

Now,

Look at the following :

(1) These are my flowers. (I am confused because here all words are in plural form except my)

(2) They are my friends. (I am confused because here all words are in plural form except my)

Could you tell me the above sentences are right or wrong?
In English, the possessive pronoun (or whatever you want to call "my") does not change with the object. I can have one flower or a dozen flowers, but I still use just "my."

I know this is a contrast to French: mon ami (singular) but mes amis (plural) so perhaps this is a contrast to your native language as well. But there is no plural to "my" that changes based on the number of objects.

(PS - Next time, when you have a new question, you might want to start a new thread, rather than adding on to one that has already gotten an answer.)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Grammar GeekIn English, the possessive pronoun (or whatever you want to call "my") does not change with the object. I can have one flower or a dozen flowers, but I still use just "my."

I know this is a contrast to French: mon ami (singular) but mes amis (plural) so perhaps this is a contrast to your native language as well. But there is no plural to "my" that changes based on the number of objects.

(PS - Next time, when you have a new question, you might want to start a new thread, rather than adding on to one that has already gotten an answer.)

Ok, Thank you.