Topic: "Scandals—whether in politics, academia, or other areas—can be useful. They focus our attention on problems in ways that no speaker or reformer ever could."

I could tell that scandals are useful, and they focus our attention on problems and caution us to behave moral or even drive us to impose reform on problems.

But as it comes to the second part of the claim, I couldn't think out any example to support scandals focus our attention on problems in ways that no speaker or reformer ever could, or both speaker/ reformer and scandals call our attention on problems in the same way.

Thanks so much for your time.
We human beings have a type of [sometimes shameful, sometimes prurient] interest in scandals that can cause us to be more attentive to a problem than what listening to some speaker talking about the problem can cause. The more focused attention caused by a scandal may have something to do with how a given problem is 'brought closer to home' by a scandal. A scandal makes the problem more real in our minds; we experience it less as an abstraction.
Thanks so much, Davkett. See if I comprehend it right Emotion: smile :

This kind of interest couldn't be triggered by speakers. And a scandal makes the problem more real in our mind that a speaker couldn't, because it happens around us.