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1. help + verb: "help provide mammograms to those in need" - Breast Cancer.
2. help + to + verb: "Spatial Patterns In Tropical Forests Can Help To Understand Their High Biodiversity." - Science Daily.

I often see most people use form #1. However, sometimes, others do use form #2. Which one of the two is correct?

Thanks,
Hoa Thai
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Hi,

Both ways are correct.

Some people consider omitting the 'to' a bit more informal.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
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CliveHi,

Both ways are correct.

Some people consider omitting the 'to' a bit more informal.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

May I re-phrase my question?

Let us first assume that the following statements are from John's mother, Ann.

1. Please take this lunch box to your father.
2. Please help me take this lunch box to your father.
3. Please help me to take this lunch box to your father.

Based on your reply earlier, they are grammatically all right. Therefore, I now wonder if all three mean the same!

Personally, I think the first two carry the same meaning, although the second one is more polite; Ann is asking John to deliver the lunch box to his father by himself. However, the last statement could mean that Ann is asking for John's help so she can deliver the lunch box to her husband. In other words, in the first two statements, the main actor (the person who takes the lunch box to Ann's husband) is John; while in the last statement, the main actor is Ann with her son's help.

What do you think?

Thanks and Best Regards,
Hoa Thai
«Therefore, I now wonder if all three mean the same!»

In sentences #2 and #3 Kohn is asked to help Ann with delivering launch to his father (so that they do it together), while in #1 Ann wants him to do it by himself.
Hi Hoa THai,

1. Please take this lunch box to your father.
2. Please help me take this lunch box to your father.
3. Please help me to take this lunch box to your father.


#2 means that Ann is asking John to help her with the task of taking. They will both take the lunch box to the father. ie Please help me (to) take . . .

However, consider this punctuation.

Please help me. Take this lunch box to your father. Here, only John will take it. 'Help' and take' are independent imperatives.

Informally, this kind of sentence is often punctuated with a comma instead of a period.

Clive
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