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Hi,

Please help me.

1. Would you say that Seegang, which is the word I made up and is to be considered as a proper noun for the purpose of this question, does not need the definite article the because it is unique? Can you explain that concept?

I left Seegang island.

2. I was looking a learning website and saw this note, which said that possessive phrases usually involve the definite article. Can you expound this concept? This idea of switching or rearranging words is confusing to me.

The economic framework of Korea is very conservative.

The Korean economic framework is very conservative.
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1-- A proper noun is unique; therefore it does not usually need the definite article to make it specific.

2-- the possessive phrase defines the noun (here, framework); thereby it becomes specific and usually takes the definite article.
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Believer Are they conguent in that we can follow both of them to decide whether to put the article the in front the name of a river like "Seegang" river? I am assuming the word "Seegang" is a name of a person or a place. Isn't there a conflict of understanding as what to follow when confront with the situation of choosing the right article for a name of the river? How about your way as I interprete it, "Seegang is a proper noun so there is no need to define it (???)"? I am somewhat contused.

Sorry if my question isn't phrased clearly.
Believer, you are making English grammar more difficult than it is. Emotion: smile Consult any grammar book and you'll get this information:

The names of rivers take the:
the Seegang river/River
the [river/River] Seegang


Towns, cities and villages take no article:
He visited Seegang last week.

People's names take no article:
I saw Seegang last week.

CB
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Thank you.

I was looking at an online grammar help site and it seemed to have mentioned the idea that the is not necessary for a name of a river. Is that can be one valid reason for not putting the definite article in front of the word "Seegang"?

Then I went to check out David Appleyard's Guide to Article Usage in English and it seems to note that no article is needed for most places consisting of just the name of a person, or the name of a person/place followed by a noun like the famous McDonald.

Are they conguent in that we can follow both of them to decide whether to put the article the in front the name of a river like "Seegang" river? I am assuming the word "Seegang" is a name of a person or a place. Isn't there a conflict of understanding as what to follow when confront with the situation of choosing the right article for a name of the river? How about your way as I interprete it, "Seegang is a proper noun so there is no need to define it (???)"? I am somewhat contused.

Sorry if my question isn't phrased clearly.
Is it accurate to say? : There is an enegy pushing me in that direction.
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There is an energy pushing me in that direction.

This is grammatically OK.
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.