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Can I say,

(a) He helped his mother up to the sofa.

(b) He helped his mother to the sofa.

(c) He helped his mother (up) and sat on the sofa.
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Comments  
(a) He helped his mother up to the sofa. -- Not likely unless the sofa was on a raised platform or something like that. If you mean "helped her to sit down" then you could say "helped his mother onto the sofa".

(b) He helped his mother to the sofa. -- OK. For example, he helped her walk across the room to the sofa.

(c) He helped his mother and sat on the sofa. -- If you mean that his sitting on the sofa somehow helped his mother then I suppose this is feasible. Otherwise the sentence is weird and incongruous.

He helped his mother up and sat on the sofa. -- Possible I suppose. "Helped up" would normally be understood to mean "helped up out of a chair" or possibly "helped up from the floor". After doing this he could sit on the sofa ... I suppose.
Thanks, If I give the context like this way:

John's mother fell from the stool. He shouted for help.

(a) He helped his mother up to the sofa.

(b) He helped his mother to the sofa.

(c) He helped his mother (up) and sat on the sofa.

Which is correct?
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Thanks, If I give the context like this way:

John's mother fell from the stool. He shouted for help.

(a) He helped his mother up to the sofa. -- Yes, in this context it's OK.

(b) He helped his mother to the sofa. -- OK.

(c) He helped his mother (up) and sat on the sofa. -- Possible, but a few extra words would help to link the two parts of the sentence better: "He helped his mother (up) and then went to sit on the sofa".
Can I say,

(a) He helped his mother up onto the sofa. In this example, the mother is near the sofa and he helped her sit.

(b) He helped his mother to the sofa. OK

(c) He helped his mother (up) and sat on the sofa. This is not a good sentence. It is too vague. It sounds as if he helped his mother and then he sat on the sofa which isn't what I think you mean. Well, that is unless he wanted her spot on the sofa which doesn't seem like a good son. Therefore, I think what you mean is:

He helped his mother up into a seated position on the sofa.

A problem with all these sentences is that you're trying to convey too much information with too few words. Remember that context is very important and without prior information you must be very clear.

Better still:

The woman was lying on the sofa and unable to sit up on her own. Therefore, her son helped her sit up.

cwtch, Vincent explained that the woman had fallen off the stool, onto the ground.
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Thanks. Can Isay,

He helped his mother to sit (up) on the sofa.
Vincent TeoThanks. Can Isay,

He helped his mother to sit (up) on the sofa.

Yes, but only if she is lying down on the sofa and needs to be helped into a sitting position.

cwtch, Vincent explained that the woman had fallen off the stool, onto the ground.

For some reason I didn't see that part.

Then it would be:

a) He helped his mother get up and to the sofa.

But better:

He helped his mother get up from the floor where she had fallen and then he helped her to the sofa.

But it will vary with how much prior context is provided:

His mother had fallen off her stool and onto the floor. He helped her get up and helped her to the sofa.

But how did he help her? We can add more information and color to the sentence without any additional words.

His mother had fallen off her stool and onto the floor. He helped her get up and held her arm to the sofa.
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