It seems the Nigels don't like the Herberts. According to the new Concise Oxford Dictionary, as reported by the Daily Telegraph:

The dictionary includes 240,000 words, 2,000 of which are new. These include:
• Herbert - an undistinguished or foolish man as in a bunch of spotty herberts;
• Mentalist - an eccentric or mad person;
• Noogie - an instance of rubbing a person's head with one's knuckles as a prank or to express affection;
• Va-va-voom - the quality of being exciting, vigorous or sexually attractive.
I do wish someone would have placed a comma after "vigorous."

And I thought a mentalist was a subset of magician (see Kreskin, he even has a web site www.amazingkreskin.com).

Al in Dallas
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It seems the Nigels

Ah you can't beat healthy stereotyping.
don't like the Herberts. According to the new Concise Oxford Dictionary, as reported by the Daily Telegraph:

Can you get the Telegraph in Dallas?
The dictionary includes 240,000 words, 2,000 of which are new. These include: • Herbert - an undistinguished or foolish man as in a bunch of spotty herberts;

Well, good on the Torygraph. This is 1950s talk at the latest, good to hear they're managing to keep up; by the same token it may be new to the dictionary, but it belongs to my father's (WW2) generation. It's generally 'spotty herbert'; shades of pre-IT nerdery.
• Mentalist - an eccentric or mad person;

Mmm, no. Generally a clubber who's mad for it. This may be because they're on one. Don't expect the Telegraph to know about such things.
• Noogie - an instance of rubbing a person's head with one's knuckles as a prank or to express affection;

If they say so, but I reckon they made this one up. Probably you need to noogie after reading the Telgraph for too long.
• Va-va-voom - the quality of being exciting, vigorous or sexually attractive.

The quality of watching French football stars advertising Renault cars more like.I was talking to a colleague who's one of the French lecturers the other day, about the differing ability of Americans and Brits to work things out from context. We spend our lives watching US media and can generally puzzle out esoteric stuff like how the peculiar US education system works, or the rules of baseball, and take it in our strides, yet one constantly sees postings on the lines of "I've just heard some wacky Brit talking about ...

and I'd no idea what he was on about". Her example was an American who totally failed to work out the phrase 'chat-up line' and had to have it translated as 'pick-up line' (which I'd say is not quite synonymous); on one of our parallel groups someone is genuinely puzzled about what a High Street is. Come on guys, we're not that bloody difficult.
Django in Durango
. Noogie - an instance of rubbing a person's head with one's knuckles as a prank or to express affection;

If they say so, but I reckon they made this one up. Probably you need to noogie after reading the Telgraph for too long.

No. That's an old one. And it's not a verb, it's a noun. One can deliver a noogie, or be the recipient of a noogie. It's a friendly form of teasing.
. Va-va-voom - the quality of being exciting, vigorous or sexually attractive.

The quality of watching French football stars advertising Renault cars more like.

I have never heard this term used as an adjective before. Ordinarily it is an interjection and usually there is an extra "va" within it. Upon seeing a sexy woman, one might say, "Va va va VOOM!" It is similar in meaning to "Ooh la la!", or "Hubba-hubba!"
Don
Kansas City
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Al in Dallas filted:
It seems the Nigels don't like the Herberts. According to the new Concise Oxford Dictionary, as reported by the Daily ... which are new. These include: • Herbert - an undistinguished or foolish man as in a bunch of spotty herberts;

Interesting...some thirty years ago my cadre started calling people "Delbert" as a variation of "nerd" or "geek"...I don't know if Scott Adams came through New Mexico during this brief fad....
Used to have a boss who preferred to be called "Wolly" (his given name is Brian)...having picked up some sense of the British slang meaning of this term (and he was English), this always struck me as odd....r
If they say so, but I reckon they made this one up. Probably you need to noogie after reading the Telgraph for too long.

No. That's an old one. And it's not a verb, it's a noun. One can deliver a noogie, or be the recipient of a noogie. It's a friendly form of teasing.

Sounds like maybe the Telegraph's reporting an AmE usage. Another one I picked up recently in Dilbert was a wedgie, when someone (often Bob the Dinosaur) pulls your shirt out of your trousers. Is that well known?

Djanck near Manc
No. That's an old one. And it's not a verb, ... recipient of a noogie. It's a friendly form of teasing.

Sounds like maybe the Telegraph's reporting an AmE usage. Another one I picked up recently in Dilbert was a wedgie, when someone (often Bob the Dinosaur) pulls your shirt out of your trousers. Is that well known? Djanck near Manc

A wedgie is accomplished when someone grabs your undershorts in the back and pulls violently upward, leaving them deeply imbedded between your buttocks.
LP
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Uh...actually he's not pulling his shirttail out. A wedgie (or what we called a "snuggie" when I was a child) is when you grab someone's underwear waistband and pull upward vigorously. I'll let you draw your own mental picture and discover where the name comes from.
Don
Kansas City
? Noogie - an instance of rubbing a person's head with one's knuckles as a prank or to express affection;

If they say so, but I reckon they made this one up. Probably you need to noogie after reading the Telgraph for too long.

I was talking to a colleague who's one of the French lecturers the other day, about the differing ability of ... lines of "I've just heard some wacky Brit talking about ... and I'd no idea what he was on about".

Sorry, I just found the juxtaposition amusing.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
need Sounds like maybe the Telegraph's reporting an AmE usage. ... of your trousers. Is that well known? Djanck near Manc

A wedgie is accomplished when someone grabs your undershorts in the back and pulls violently upward, leaving them deeply imbedded between your buttocks. LP

LOL!! That's much funnier!
DC
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