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Why does "Here goes nothing" have almost the same meaning as "Here we go"? I mean, it's "nothing"...you know...
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They don't mean the same, Taka. 'Here goes nothing' means 'I am going to begin, but I think I will not succeed, or I think it will be very difficult to accomplish'. 'Here we go' just means, well, 'here we go, we are starting'; it also sometimes means 'here we are' upon arrival or success.

Both are informal, idiomatic, primarily spoken English, and as far as the 'nothing' is concerned, I can't really place it grammatically. I suppose that it refers to the expectation that the result will be zero.
"They don't mean the same, Taka. 'Here goes nothing' means 'I am going to begin, but I think I will not succeed"

I know. That's why I said "almost" the same.

Anyway, thank you for the explanation!
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Think it was meant to be something like: Here (it either goes all the way, or then) nothing (happens). Just that over time, that middle part's now skipped, as implied.
Hi,

Why does "Here goes nothing" have almost the same meaning as "Here we go"? I mean, it's "nothing"...you know...

I agree with the comments that they do not have the same meaning, but I don't entirely agree with the rest of what's been said so far.

I see "Here goes nothing" as a phrase rooted in gambling. If I bet $5 on a horse, I might say 'Here goes $5', in the sense of 'I am risking this $5'. Hence, if I am about to do something and I say 'Here goes nothing', it means, roughly speaking, that I feel there is no real risk involved or that I do not care about the risk.

Thus, the meaning of the two phrases is not even 'almost' the same.

Best wishes, Clive

Wow, I just looked at the dates. This is an old thread!
I agree with Mister Micawber. His explanation is perfect.
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CliveThus, the meaning of the two phrases is not even 'almost' the same.

I agree that the phrases are not almost the same at all, though I am more familiar with MM's depiction of its use.
clive's explanation would make much more sense to me if it ended with "there is too much risk involved and i will not bet money on it. here goes nought dollars as a bet on my sucess".

well, i'm not quite convinced anyway =)
ex.

A: I have never tried snowboarding before. Well, here goes nothing.

This means we think we won’t be good at snowboarding, because we haven’t tried it before, but we will try anyway.
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