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I know that a famous line "Here's looking at you, kid." is from the 1942 film Casablanca.

My question is the intepretation of this well-known phrase.

What would be the grammatical construction of this phrase?

Is it supposed to be interpreted as; "Here is to looking at you, kid.", meaning

I WANT TO TOAST FOR THE FACT THAT I AM LOOKING AT YOU.

or,

"Here is to I who is looking at you, kid.", meaning

I WANT TO TOAST FOR ME WHO IS LOOKING AT YOU.

Why there is no "to" after "Here's"? Is it ommitted?

Can anybody, please, answer my question?
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Hi,

I would take a chance and say that this could be an elliptical construction, which meant to be "The one here (i.e., "I") is looking at you, Kid."

Although I don't like this as much as the one above, I think this also could be "Here is (all of us who are) looking at you, Kid" -- another elliptical construction.
Neither. Don't try to read too much into this one. It's just "Good luck to you and your future endeavors."

If he had said "So long and good luck, sweetheart" it would have had roughtly the same meaning, but not been nearly as quoteable.
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Grammar GeekNeither. Don't try to read too much into this one. It's just "Good luck to you and your future endeavors."

If he had said "So long and good luck, sweetheart" it would have had roughtly the same meaning, but not been nearly as quoteable.
I agree. It's just a toast, with or without an alcoholic beverage. It's still common: here's to you / here's lookin' at you. Even "here's to/lookin' at us".
Thank you for your reply.

I was just a bit curious. Language is language. So, sometimes, perhaps, it would be

better not to look into too much and accept what they are.
=Here is (my) looking at you, kid!
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"Here's looking at you" is also said by Horace (the deputy) in response to the sheriff's offering him whisky ... In East of Eden.
It's not supposed to be grammatically correct. In the movie Casablanca, Bogart toasts Bergman, and he uses that line, "Here's looking at you, kid." When you give a toast you usually say, "Here's to Marco Polo for having adventures." In the movie though, Bogart is trying to illustrate that he loves looking at Bergman so that's why he says it. It is a toast to her beauty, and what everyone gets when they look at her. Bogart played a lot of gangsters in his movies, so he didn't always speak correctly. It doesn't take away from the beauty of the line, rather it makes it more poignant.
"Here's lookin at you, kid" can be broken down as follows: "Here's" is the set up of a toast. "Looking at you" is the toast. "Kid" is adressing the woman, you (in this quote). He's toasting the joys of merely having her in his sight. The missing "to" after Here's" is american slang, leaving certain prepositions out is common.
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